Web Design and Development

Introducing Drupal.org Terms of Service and Privacy Policy

Drupal - Fri, 08/08/2014 - 06:50

Almost half a year ago, with the help of the Drupal.org Content Working Group and lawyers, the Drupal Association started working on a Drupal.org Terms of Service (ToS) and Privacy Policy. After a number of drafts and rewrites, we are now ready to introduce both documents to Drupal.org users.

Why do we need a ToS?

Drupal.org has grown organically for many years. Currently the site has thousands of active users that generate lots of content every day. Our current Terms of Service are limited to a short line on the account creation form:

“Please note: All user accounts are for individuals. Accounts created for more than one user or those using anonymous mail services will be blocked when discovered.”

This line is an insufficient ToS for a website of our size. In fact, Drupal.org is probably the only website of this size which operates without a published Terms of Service. This situation is uncomfortable, and even dangerous, for both Drupal community and the Drupal Association, which is legally responsible for Drupal.org and its contents.

In the absence of a ToS, a lot of rules—“do’s and don’ts”—regarding the website are just “common knowledge” of users who have a long memory and accounts created in the early days of Drupal.org. This might result in new users making mistakes and misbehaving only because they do not know what the unwritten rules are. Website moderators often lack guidance on how to react in specific situations, because those policies are not written anywhere. Some policies, such as organization accounts policy or account deletion policy still need to be defined. Lastly, absence of clearly defined Terms of Service and Privacy Policy could lead to legal disputes regarding the site.

What’s next?

The new Drupal.org Terms of Service and Privacy Policy are published now for the community review. They will be made official in 4 weeks, on September 4th, 2014. On that day all existing users will have to accept these ToS and Privacy Policy to continue using the website. All new users starting on that day will have to accept the ToS and Privacy Policy upon account creation.

Click to review Drupal.org Terms of Service

Click to review Drupal.org Privacy Policy

In the future, we will make sure to keep ToS and Privacy Policy up-to-date and update them every time policies or functionality of the website changes. We will proactively notify users of all modifications to both documents.

Thanks

We’d like to say thanks to the Drupal.org Content Working Group members and community members who already reviewed proposed documents and provided us with their valuable feedback.

Drupal 7.31 and 6.33 released

Drupal - Wed, 08/06/2014 - 10:35

Drupal 7.31 and Drupal 6.33, maintenance releases which contain fixes for security vulnerabilities, are now available for download. See the Drupal 7.31 and Drupal 6.33 release notes for further information.

Download Drupal 7.31
Download Drupal 6.33

Upgrading your existing Drupal 7 and 6 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features or non-security-related bug fixes in these releases. For more information about the Drupal 7.x release series, consult the Drupal 7.0 release announcement. More information on the Drupal 6.x release series can be found in the Drupal 6.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 7 and 6 include the built-in Update Status module (renamed to Update Manager in Drupal 7), which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

Bug reports

Both Drupal 7.x and 6.x are being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports) more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Changelog

Drupal 7.31 is a security release only. For more details, see the 7.31 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 6.33 is a security release only. For more details, see the 6.33 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 6.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Security vulnerabilities

Drupal 7.31 and 6.33 were released in response to the discovery of security vulnerabilities. Details can be found in the official security advisory:

To fix the security problem, please upgrade to either Drupal 7.31 or Drupal 6.33.

Update notes

See the 7.31 and 6.33 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues

None.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 6.xDrupal 7.x

Drupal 7.30 released

Drupal - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 15:12

Drupal 7.30, a maintenance release with several bug fixes (no security fixes), including a fix for regressions introduced in Drupal 7.29, is now available for download. See the Drupal 7.30 release notes for a full listing.

Download Drupal 7.30

Upgrading your existing Drupal 7 sites is recommended. There are no new features in this release. For more information about the Drupal 7.x release series, consult the Drupal 7.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 7 includes the built-in Update Manager module, which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

There are no security fixes in this release of Drupal core.

Bug reports

Drupal 7.x is being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports), more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Changelog

Drupal 7.30 is a bug fix only release. The full list of changes between the 7.29 and 7.30 releases can be found by reading the 7.30 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Update notes

See the 7.30 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues

None.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 7.x

Drupal 7.29 and 6.32 released

Drupal - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 13:37

Drupal 7.29 and Drupal 6.32, maintenance releases which contain fixes for security vulnerabilities, are now available for download. See the Drupal 7.29 and Drupal 6.32 release notes for further information.

Download Drupal 7.29
Download Drupal 6.32

Upgrading your existing Drupal 7 and 6 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features or non-security-related bug fixes in these releases. For more information about the Drupal 7.x release series, consult the Drupal 7.0 release announcement. More information on the Drupal 6.x release series can be found in the Drupal 6.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 7 and 6 include the built-in Update Status module (renamed to Update Manager in Drupal 7), which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

Bug reports

Both Drupal 7.x and 6.x are being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports) more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Changelog

Drupal 7.29 is a security release only. For more details, see the 7.29 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 6.32 is a security release only. For more details, see the 6.32 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 6.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Security vulnerabilities

Drupal 7.29 and 6.32 were released in response to the discovery of security vulnerabilities. Details can be found in the official security advisory:

To fix the security problem, please upgrade to either Drupal 7.29 or Drupal 6.32.

Known issues

None.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 6.xDrupal 7.x

Drupal.org Maintenance: July 8th 11:00 PDT (July 8th 18:00 UTC)

Drupal - Mon, 06/30/2014 - 10:21

Drupal.org will be affected by maintenance Tuesday, July 8th, 11:00 PDT (July 8th, 18:00 UTC).

To finish our load balancer rebuilds, we are moving traffic from our old load balancer to our new. During this process, there maybe a five minute period of brief instability.

Please follow the @drupal_infra Twitter account for any issues encountered during the maintenance window.

Thanks for your patience!

Drupal.org Maintenance: July 2nd 13:00 PDT (July 2nd 20:00 UTC)

Drupal - Wed, 06/25/2014 - 13:00

Drupal.org will be affected by maintenance Wednesday, July 2nd, 13:00 PDT (July 2nd, 20:00 UTC).

To finish our CDN deployment on Drupal.org, we are moving the www.drupal.org CNAME to point at our CDN edge. The CNAME switch should be seamless and only take a few minutes to update across DNS.

Please follow the @drupal_infra Twitter account for any issues encountered during the maintenance window.

Thanks for your patience!

Drupal 6 extended support announcement

Drupal - Wed, 06/18/2014 - 09:42

On February 13, 2008, Drupal 6 was released. The policy of the community is to support only the current and previous stable versions. (When Drupal 6 was released, Drupal 4.7.x was marked unsupported. When Drupal 7 came out, Drupal 5.x was marked unsupported.) This policy was created to prevent core and module maintainers from having to maintain more than 2 active major versions of Drupal.

With the coming Drupal 8 release, this policy has been questioned. We want to ensure that sites that wish to move from Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 have a supported window within which to do so. The Drupal core team, key module maintainers, and representatives of the Drupal security team met at Drupalcon Austin to discuss this as an in-person follow up to the previous discussion at https://drupal.org/node/2136029.

Drupal 6 core and modules will transition to unsupported status three months after Drupal 8 is released. "Unsupported status" means the community will not be providing support or patches in the same way we do now. Continuing to support Drupal 6 would be difficult for many reasons, including a lack of automated test coverage, the requirement for rigorous manual release testing, the slow-down it introduces in the release of security fixes for the vast majority of Drupal users (on version 7+), and the general shift of volunteers in the community moving their attention onto Drupal 8 development.

This gives Drupal 6 users a few options:

1) Upgrade to Drupal 7 any time between now and 3 months after Drupal 8.0.0 is released. Drupal 7 releases undergo almost 40,000 automated tests, and Drupal 7 will be fully supported at least until Drupal 9 comes out. Given the past history, the release of Drupal 9 is likely to be around 2018.

2) Upgrade to Drupal 8 after it is released, but before Drupal 6 is not supported anymore. Fortunately, Migrate support for Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 is already in core, and there is Migrate UI, a contributed module. While not all contributed modules will be ready at the time Drupal 8 is released, Drupal 8's migration path handles most of the critical site data via its CCK to Entities/Fields in Core migrations.

3) Find an organization that will provide extended support for Drupal 6. The Drupal Security Team will provide a method for companies and/or individuals to work together in the private security issue queue to continue developing updates, and will provide a reasonable amount of time for companies to provide patches to Drupal 6 security issues that also affect Drupal 7 or Drupal 8. The security team will coordinate access to issues for companies wishing to provide extended support for Drupal 6. However, the team will not explicitly review or test the patches (some team members may do this on their own). All code created by these vendors, would be released to the community.

Organizations and individuals interested in providing this level of support for their customers
AND who have the technical knowledge to maintain a Drupal core release should go to the security team Drupal 6 long term support page.

Both the Security Team and Drupal core leadership feel that a 3-month window after Drupal 8's release before eclipsing community support for Drupal 6 is a workable compromise between leaving Drupal 6 sites on an unsupported version the second Drupal 8 comes out, and acknowledging that our community's volunteer resources are limited and have shifted focus. We hope that organizations that rely on Drupal 6 will step up to help maintain it after community support winds down, and/or help their clients update to D8.

Drupal version: Drupal 6.x

Drupal 6 extended support announcement

Drupal - Wed, 06/18/2014 - 09:42

On February 13, 2008, Drupal 6 was released. The policy of the community is to drop support only the current and previous stable versions. (When Drupal 6 was released, Drupal 4.7.x was marked unsupported. When Drupal 7 came out, Drupal 5.x was marked unsupported.) This policy was created to prevent core and module maintainers from having to maintain more than 2 active major versions of Drupal.

With the coming Drupal 8 release, this policy has been questioned, we want to ensure that sites that wish to move from Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 have a supported window within which to do so. The Drupal core team, key module maintainers, and representatives of the Drupal security team met at Drupalcon Austin to discuss this as an in-person follow up to the previous discussion at https://drupal.org/node/2136029.

Drupal 6 core and modules will transition to unsupported status three months after Drupal 8 is released. "Unsupported status" means the community will not be providing support or patches in the same way we do now. Continuing to support Drupal 6 would be difficult for many reasons, including a lack of automated test coverage, the requirement for rigorous manual release testing, the slow-down it introduces in the release of security fixes for the vast majority of Drupal users (on version 7+), and the general shift of volunteers in the community moving their attention onto Drupal 8 development.

This gives Drupal 6 users a few options:

1) Upgrade to Drupal 7 any time between now and 3 months after Drupal 8.0.0 is released. Drupal 7 releases undergo almost 40,000 automated tests, and Drupal 7 will be fully supported at least until Drupal 9 comes out. Given the past history, the release of Drupal 9 is likely to be around 2018.

2) Upgrade to Drupal 8 after it is released, but before Drupal 6 is not supported anymore. Fortunately, Migrate support for Drupal 6 to Drupal 8 is already in core, and there is a Migrate UI that is a contributed module at the moment. While not all contributed modules will be ready at the time Drupal 8 is released, Drupal 8's migration path handles most of the critical site data via its CCK to Entities/Fields in Core migrations.

3) Find an organization that will provide extended support for Drupal 6. The Drupal Security Team will provide a method for companies and/or individuals to work together in the private security issue queue to continue developing updates, and will provide a reasonable amount of time for companies to provide patches to Drupal 6 security issues that also affect Drupal 7 or Drupal 8. The security team will coordinate access to issues for companies wishing to provide extended support for Drupal 6. However, the team will not explicitly review or test the patches (some team members may do this on their own). All code, created by these vendors, would be released to the community.

Organizations and individuals interested in providing this level of support for their customers
AND who have the technical knowledge to maintain a Drupal core release Should go to the security team Drupal 6 long term support page.

Both the Security Team and Drupal core leadership feel that a 3-month window after Drupal 8's release before eclipsing community support for Drupal 6 is a workable compromise between leaving Drupal 6 sites on an unsupported version the second Drupal 8 comes out, and acknowledging that our community's volunteer resources are limited and have shifted focus. We hope that organizations that rely on Drupal 6 will step up to help maintain it after community support winds down, and/or help their clients update to D8.

Drupal version: Drupal 6.x

Drupal.org Maintenance: June 18th 3PM PDT (June 18th 22:00 UTC)

Drupal - Mon, 06/16/2014 - 14:44

Drupal.org will be affected by maintenance Wednesday, June 18th, 15:00 PDT (June 18th, 22:00 UTC) and ending Wednesday, June 18th, 16:00 PDT (June 19th, 23:00 UTC).

In preparation for our CDN deployment on Drupal.org, we are moving Drupal.org to www.drupal.org. The name switch should be seamless and only take a few minutes to update in various places.

Please follow the @drupal_infra Twitter account for any issues encountered during the maintenance window.

Thanks for your patience!

Drupal.org Maintenance: June 16th 4PM PDT (June 16th 23:00 UTC)

Drupal - Thu, 06/12/2014 - 15:04

Drupal.org will be affected by our ISP’s maintenance window starting Monday, June 16th, 16:00 PDT (June 16th, 23:00 UTC) and ending Monday, June 16th, 18:00 PDT (June 17th, 01:00 UTC).

Our ISP will be upgrading the firmware on the customer aggregation routers, and we expect to see a 10‒15 minute disruption in traffic sometime during the maintenance window.

Please follow the @drupal_infra Twitter account for any issues encountered during the maintenance window.

Thanks for your patience!

Design Finder for Mac Released

The Flash Blog - Wed, 06/04/2014 - 23:48

As you know I have been doing Cocoa development for a while now. You will see some of my Adobe work very soon, but in the meantime, my first personal app called Design Finder is now available on the Mac App Store.

The idea for this app came about because I’m always searching my hard drive for visual assets to use for FPO or just for inspiration. There are a staggering number of visual files on OS X that are buried inside of system frameworks, application packages, and other hard-to-search places. Spotlight just plain sucks for this purpose and is restricted as to where it can search.

On the first screen you set up your search with a starting directory, an optional search term, and the types of files you’re looking for. The results are displayed in a zoomable grid (see top image) and you can then reveal a file in Finder or open it with the application of your choice. Finding things like cursor images, icons, and other hard to find items is now a breeze.

I also created a microsite for the app at designfinderapp.com so check it out for more information. Hope you like it!

Swift is Here

The Flash Blog - Mon, 06/02/2014 - 17:39

Well today Apple announced their new programming language called Swift. This is very similar in syntax to what the next version of JavaScript will look like. I’m pretty excited about it even though I spent all that time learning Objective-C. I’m planning on blogging and creating some tutorials on the new language and I even procured swiftvideotutorials.com for any video tutorials I end up doing.

Here are some useful links to start checking it out:

Exciting times!

Community Spotlight on Emanuel Greucean, Maurits Dekkers, and Ernő Zsemlye

Drupal - Tue, 05/20/2014 - 09:03

For this month’s community spotlight, we wanted to showcase three stellar Drupalistas who went above and beyond at the Dev Days Szeged sprints. Emanuel Greucean (gremy), Maurits Dekkers (Mauzeh), and Ernő Zsemlye (zserno) all made big contributions to the project at Dev Days Szeged. Here’s a little bit about each.

Emanuel Greucean (gremy) How did you get involved with Drupal?

I got involved with Drupal right after college, in 2009. I went to a job interview, showed the employers my enthusiasm about web development and my very not impressive profile, one of which was a Joomla website, and they accepted me. At this job, I got initiated in the art of web development and got a solid education in Drupal. At my first day on the job, I was given the Drupal Developer’s “Bible” (Pro Drupal Development, 2nd edition), and was told that I had to know it by heart.

What do you think open source represents?

For me, open source represents the opportunity to have access to awesome products for free. It also represents the opportunity to join a community of passionate developers and to learn a lot, and also to pass on your knowledge. If you are a contributor, it’s also an opportunity to leave a mark, and a joy to know that your work is being used by millions of people.

Why did you choose to work in Szeged on beta blocking, and what is your fondest memory from Szeged?

One reason for working on beta blockers in Szeged was the desire to get Drupal 8 as close as possible to being released, because I really want to start using it in Production.

One of my fondest memories from Szeged might be the moment when I actually finished the last missing "Change Record” issue, and with this Drupal 8 change records were up to date for the first time in three years. Also I really appreciate all the help I received from people I had never met before. They initiated me into contributing to the community.

Are you working on any fun projects at the moment?

Yes. I am currently collaborating with Kalamuna, a Drupal shop from San Francisco's East Bay Area. They are really great colleagues, and I have the opportunity to work on great projects with them. One of the projects I am most excited about is Kalabox, and I have to say that I am really enthusiastic about its future.

Maurits Dekkers (Mauzeh) How did you get involved with Drupal?

I got involved with Drupal through a client about three years ago. They were using Drupal mainly for its ability to allow site builders to create their own fieldable data structures. Until then I had mostly worked with Zend Framework and Symfony, and I never even knew there was an open source system that could do this! Or course, now I know that there is so much more about Drupal that is awesome, and I cannot imagine a web development life without it!

What do you think open source represents?

For me, open source represents people (!) who provide their time, effort, and financial resources on something that provides only indirect value. An open source developer spends their free time working on a feature not knowing whether it will actually make it into the final product (unless they are the project lead...). For some this might be an unrewarding way of working because there appear to be few direct, short-term, rewards. So if you contribute something to open source software, you must do it for reasons unrelated to direct income or revenue. Therefore, the passion that people have for the product comes from a much deeper belief.

Why did you choose to work in Szeged on Drupal 8 beta blocking/debugging, and what is your fondest memory from Szeged?

Despite working with open source software on a daily basis, and lurking around in the issue queues, I never had the guts to really get involved. I realized that getting to know the people behind the nicknames would certainly help because I could just walk over and ask something. So when I saw the announcement for Szeged, I jumped in straight away. And I'm really glad I did. I most remember the people I was working with and having beers with at night, with Cathy (YesCT) being just amazing to get people up to speed. Her passion for the community is really remarkable. I wanted to learn more about how the Entity API works in Drupal 8, and was directed to tstoeckler and plach, from whom I learned very much very quickly.

Are you working on any fun projects at the moment?

I'm currently working as a freelancer for a few Drupal site building shops. Since I just started as a freelancer in November last year, I'm working quite a lot to make sure I have some financial room to contribute some more to D8.

Ernő Zsemlye (zserno) How did you get involved with Drupal?

It all started during my 4th year at the university. I needed a few more credits for the upcoming semester and stumbled upon a new elective course titled "Open Source Content Management Systems" held by a guy called Kristof Van Tomme. I had absolutely no idea about the topic but it sounded pretty cool so I applied. The first lecture was about open source in general and a brief introduction to the Drupal world. At the end of the lecture, Kristof mentioned that he was looking for interns for his new company. I applied the next day and I am sure that was the best move in my career to date. :)

What do you think open source represents?

I could compare it to traveling. Once you experience what traveling to new places feels like, you suddenly start to feel as if you had been looking at the world through a small and dirty window. Then you also realize how small you are in this life. This is so true for open source.

Why did you choose to work in Szeged on Drupal 8 beta blocking/debugging, and what is your fondest memory from Szeged?

I wanted to work on something that would give me the opportunity to dive deep into Drupal 8 and learn as much as possible about the new system. I was assigned to an Entity API beta blocker. After having spent my first 3 days on getting my head around all the new things in D8, I got stuck. The next day Berdir pinged me on IRC that he wanted to discuss the next steps with me in person. We talked for about 5 minutes but that was enough to put me back on track with the issue and also gave me great inspiration that I could talk to a real rockstar in person.

Are you working on any fun projects at the moment?

I am working at the Central European University as a web developer. We are a small team of four people who maintain virtually any web presence of the whole university: main institutional site with heavy traffic, custom websites for each departments, research groups, alumni campaigns, student groups, etc. It is a constant challenge to use our limited resources to address all arising needs successfully. So we are continuously looking for new ways to create reusable solutions across all these websites. And this is lots of fun. For example I just finished building a custom installation profile based on the fantastic Panopoly distribution so firing up a new website became ridiculously easy.

---

Gremy, mauzeh, and zserno were just a few of a huge number of rock stars who worked hard and made great contributions at Szeged. Thank you so much to everyone who turned out for the sprints! The next major sprint event will be at DrupalCon Austin. Our community organizers (led by YesCT) have worked hard to make sure we'll have seven days of sprints that culminate in a huge sprint on Friday, June 6. We hope to see you there.

Drupal version: Drupal 8.x

Community Spotlight on Emanuel Greucean, Maurits Dekkers, and Ernő Zsemlye

Drupal - Tue, 05/20/2014 - 09:03

For this month’s community spotlight, we wanted to showcase three stellar Drupalistas who went above and beyond at the Dev Days Szeged sprints. Emanuel Greucean (gremy), Maurits Dekkers (Mauzeh), and Ernő Zsemlye (zserno) all made big contributions to the project at Dev Days Szeged. Here’s a little bit about each.

Emanuel Greucean (gremy) How did you get involved with Drupal?

I got involved with Drupal right after college, in 2009. I went to a job interview, showed the employers my enthusiasm about web development and my very not impressive profile, one of which was a Joomla website, and they accepted me. At this job, I got initiated in the art of web development and got a solid education in Drupal. At my first day on the job, I was given the Drupal Developer’s “Bible” (Pro Drupal Development, 2nd edition), and was told that I had to know it by heart.

What do you think open source represents?

For me, open source represents the opportunity to have access to awesome products for free. It also represents the opportunity to join a community of passionate developers and to learn a lot, and also to pass on your knowledge. If you are a contributor, it’s also an opportunity to leave a mark, and a joy to know that your work is being used by millions of people.

Why did you choose to work in Szeged on beta blocking, and what is your fondest memory from Szeged?

One reason for working on beta blockers in Szeged was the desire to get Drupal 8 as close as possible to being released, because I really want to start using it in Production.

One of my fondest memory from Szeged might be the moment when I actually finished the last missing "Change Record” issue, and with this Drupal 8 change records were up to date for the first time in three years. Also I really appreciate all the help I received from people I had never met before. They initiated me into contributing to the community.

Are you working on any fun projects at the moment?

Yes. I am currently collaborating with Kalamuna, a Drupal shop from San Francisco's East Bay Area. They are really great colleagues, and I have the opportunity to work on great projects with them. One of the projects I am most excited about is Kalabox, and I have to say that I am really enthusiastic about its future.

Maurits Dekkers (Mauzeh) How did you get involved with Drupal?

I got involved with Drupal through a client about three years ago. They were using Drupal mainly for its ability to allow site builders to create their own fieldable data structures. Until then I had mostly worked with Zend Framework and Symfony, and I never even knew there was an open source system that could do this! Or course, now I know that there is so much more about Drupal that is awesome, and I cannot imagine a web development life without it!

What do you think open source represents?

For me, open source represents people (!) who provide their time, effort, and financial resources on something that provides only indirect value. An open source developer spends their free time working on a feature not knowing whether it will actually make it into the final product (unless they are the project lead...). For some this might be an unrewarding way of working because there appear to be few direct, short-term, rewards. So if you contribute something to open source software, you must do it for reasons unrelated to direct income or revenue. Therefore, the passion that people have for the product comes from a much deeper belief.

Why did you choose to work in Szeged on Drupal 8 beta blocking/debugging, and what is your fondest memory from Szeged?

Despite working with open source software on a daily basis, and lurking around in the issue queues, I never had the guts to really get involved. I realized that getting to know the people behind the nicknames would certainly help because I could just walk over and ask something. So when I saw the announcement for Szeget, I jumped in straight away. And I'm really glad I did. I most remember the people I was working with and having beers with at night, with Cathy (YesCT) being just amazing to get people up to speed. Her passion for the community is really remarkable. I wanted to learn more about how the Entity API works in Drupal 8, and was directed to tstoeckler and plach, from whom I learned very much very quickly.

Are you working on any fun projects at the moment?

I'm currently working as a freelancer for a few Drupal site building shops. Since I just started as a freelancer in November last year, I'm working quite a lot to make sure I have some financial room to contribute some more to D8.

Ernő Zsemlye (zserno) How did you get involved with Drupal?

It all started during my 4th year at the university. I needed a few more credits for the upcoming semester and stumbled upon on a new elective course titled "Open source content management systems" held by a guy called Kristof Van Tomme. I had absolutely no idea about the topic but it sounded pretty cool so I applied. The first lecture was about open source in general and a brief introduction to the Drupal world. At the end of the lecture, Kristof mentioned that he was looking for interns for his new company. I applied the next day and I am sure that was the best move in my career to date. :)

What do you think open source represents?

I could compare it to traveling. Once you experience what traveling to new places feels like, you suddenly start to feel as if you had been looking at the world through a small and dirty window. Then you also realize how small you are in this life. This is so true for open source.

Why did you choose to work in Szeged on Drupal 8 beta blocking/debugging, and what is your fondest memory from Szeged?

I wanted to work on something that would give me the opportunity to dive deep into Drupal 8 and learn as much as possible about the new system. I was assigned to an Entity API beta blocker. After having spent my first 3 days on getting my head around all the new things in D8, I got stuck. The next day Berdir pinged me on IRC that he wanted to discuss the next steps with me in person. We talked for about 5 minutes but that was enough to put me back on track with the issue and also gave me great inspiration that I could talk to a real rockstar in person.

Are you working on any fun projects at the moment?

I am working at the Central European University as a web developer. We are a small team of four people who maintain virtually any web presence of the whole university: main institutional site with heavy traffic, custom websites for each departments, research groups, alumni campaigns, student groups, etc. It is a constant challenge to use our limited resources to address all arising needs successfully. So we are continuously looking for new ways to create reusable solutions across all these websites. And this is lots of fun. For example I just finished building a custom installation profile based on the fantastic Panopoly distribution so firing up a new website became ridiculously easy.

---

Gremy, mauzeh, and zserno were just a few of a huge number of rock stars who worked hard and made great contributions at Szeged. Thank you so much to everyone who turned out for the sprints! The next major sprint event will be at DrupalCon Austin. Our community organizers (led by YesCT) have worked hard to make sure we'll have seven days of sprints that culminate in a huge sprint on Friday, June 6. We hope to see you there.

Drupal version: Drupal 8.x

Response Brackets Extension Source

The Flash Blog - Mon, 05/19/2014 - 03:12

Well after a long delay I’m happy to announce that my responsive design extension for Brackets is now available on Github. Please be sure to read this entire post before you check it out so you don’t experience any issues.

Some important notes
  • I haven’t had the time to update the extension to work in the latest version of Brackets. It wouldn’t take much work to do but I can’t be sure as I’ve haven’t done any JS work in over 6 months. It would be great if someone wanted to work on this and contribute the code back.
  • The current source and demo files target Sprint 25 of Brackets. To address this issue I have built both a Windows and Mac version of Sprint 25 that have already been patched with the extension so you easily demo the extension.
  • Lastly I need to make it clear that I am releasing this as my own work and this shouldn’t be considered as an official Adobe product.
Demoing the extension

Follow the steps below to try out the extension:

  1. Go to the project’s Github page and clone the repository to you hard drive.
  2. Now download the patched version of Brackets for your operating system. (Windows, Mac).
  3. After unzipping the file to your hard drive, launch the Brackets application.
  4. Now got to the File > Open Folder menu item and choose the demo website folder at the root of the Github repo.
  5. Now go and watch the video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXTP8XqrSwE and follow the exact steps I performed in the demo to make sure you don’t encounter any issues.
Working with source

Go the project’s Github page and clone the repository if you haven’t already done so. The readme file in the repo gives details about how the extension was coded and structured. For once in my life I made extensive comments throughout the code so it shouldn’t be too hard to understand what is going on.

I would love it if the community wanted to help taking this extension to the next level. After more that a year I still feel this is the right approach for implementing responsive design.

Sorry again about the long delay in getting this out and I would appreciate any feedback you have.

Adjusting NSWindow styles at runtime

The Flash Blog - Tue, 05/13/2014 - 14:35

Here is another snippet of code that I wanted to document here. In my current project I needed to make the window resizable on some screens and not resizable on others. You usually set the window styles in Interface Builder but you can do it programmatically using the setStyleMask method. You use the unary complement bitwise operator (~) to remove a particular style.

Below is the code to make a window resizable and and also not resizable:

// Make window resizable [window setStyleMask:[window styleMask] | NSResizableWindowMask]; // Make it not resizable [window setStyleMask:[window styleMask] & ~NSResizableWindowMask];