Web Design and Development

Drupal 8.0.0-rc1 released

Drupal - Wed, 10/07/2015 - 14:33

We now present the first release candidate for Drupal 8.0.0! Drupal 8 includes a tremendous number of new features and improvements for both users and developers.

We revamped Drupal's user interface; added WYSIWYG and in-place editing; significantly improved mobile support; added and improved key contributed modules including Views, Date, and Entity Reference; introduced a new object-oriented backend leveraging Symfony components; revamped configuration management; improved multilingual support; and added hundreds of other improvements. Drupal 8.0.0-rc1 is the collective work of over 3,200 core contributors. Read more about what's new in Drupal 8.0.x.

The first release candidate provides a great opportunity to begin developing with Drupal 8, especially for:

  • New sites.
  • Sites that rely mainly on the expanded functionality provided by Drupal 8 core alone.
  • Projects that will take months of development time.
  • Sites for which Drupal 8's benefits outweigh the effort needed to port (or work around) contributed modules that do not yet have Drupal 8 versions.
Using Drupal 8 # Launching new sites #

Drupal 8 itself is very functional straight out of the box -- many of the top Drupal 7 modules are now included in core, and several features have been made more flexible to avoid the need to install many other modules. Evaluate your needs, and you may easily find that everything you need for a project is already included in Drupal 8 core. Check out our slides about Drupal 8 to learn about the changes.

Updating existing sites #

The new version also includes a revamped Migrate module to update existing Drupal 6 and 7 sites to Drupal 8 directly. The migration feature is currently marked "experimental," meaning it is not yet fully supported and we are still working to improve it. For this reason, the Drupal 8 release candidate does not yet provide a user interface for migrations. Use the Migrate Plus and Migrate Upgrade modules to test migrations now, or read more about Migrate in core.

Contributed modules and themes #

There are a number of modules already ported to Drupal 8 as well as themes already being developed. We set up the contrib tracker project to make it easier to track the status of the ports of contributed modules.

DrupalCon Barcelona Drupal 8 sprint photo by Pedro Lozano (under the CC BY 2.0 license) Porting modules and themes to Drupal 8 #

If you have not done so already, now is the time to ensure that your modules and themes will work with the new version. While there are many changes in Drupal 8, we wanted to make it as easy as possible to get started porting modules. We suggest you use Drupal Module Upgrader to run a first pass of code upgrades. Some things will be automatically upgraded while others will get a @todo comment or will be left untouched.

To help you learn and apply the new APIs, the api.drupal.org site has overviews and short examples of all major Drupal 8 APIs. The Drupal.org handbooks have in-depth guides with more background information on each API as well. We also have a complete list of all API changes to Drupal 8, spanning the 4.5 years of Drupal 8's development.

Instead of using our own home-brewed templating system from Drupal 7 and earlier, Drupal 8 uses the Twig templating engine. Many of the concepts from previous versions of Drupal still apply with Twig. We are working on a guide for you to help update your themes. Also check out the Drupal 8 theming documentation for more information.

Be sure to file any core bugs that you may find while updating your module or theme.

Translating Drupal 8 #

The interface strings are officially frozen now. Only error corrections, removals or additions of whole strings, and fixes required for critical issues may be made to the interface text from this point forward. This is the best time to translate Drupal 8, so your translations will be available when the final version is released. The installer now comes with automated translation downloads, so whatever you translate now will be useful for all Drupal 8 installs. Localize.drupal.org has a summary page about core translation status in all the supported languages with a step-by-step guide in the sidebar to help you contribute.

Documentation, book, and video authors #

The user interfaces, interactions, and "look and feel" of Drupal 8.0.0 are now frozen and will only be changed if required for critical bug fixes. If you previously put your documentation, instruction video, or book project on hold, now is the time to pick it up again. Now is also the time to update documentation on Drupal.org and to get documentation fixes into Drupal 8, so the explanations are correct. Thanks for your contributions!

Be aware that Drupal 8 will employ semantic versioning, with new "minor" releases (backwards-compatible with API additions and new features) approximately every six months. So strings, user interfaces, and other visual aspects of Drupal will be improved throughout the entire Drupal 8 process, which may require subsequent updates to these materials.

Contributing to Drupal 8 core #

During the release candidate phase, only critical fixes and documentation improvements will be committed to Drupal 8 core (plus certain non-disruptive "rc target" changes at core committer discretion). Other issues that have been reviewed and tested by the community may remain uncommitted until after 8.0.0 to ensure that critical bugs can be fixed quickly without risking regressions. Read more about the allowed changes during the RC phase.

When will Drupal 8.0.0 be released? #

We will schedule an official release date for 8.0.0 when we are confident that the rate and nature of incoming critical bugs has slowed enough to ensure a stable release. Until then, release candidates of Drupal 8 will be released twice a month concurrently with the Drupal 6 and 7 release windows.

Known issues #

We are confident that our code is stable enough for wider testing by site owners, developers, and end users. There are however still known issues with Drupal 8.0.x, including major bugs. Help resolve these issues by testing Drupal 8 and searching for existing bug reports and adding more information to help resolve those bugs. If your suspected bug hasn't been reported yet, submit a bug report.

There is a known issue with response cache headers sometimes exceeding hosting configuration limits that may cause some pages to not be viewable on some hosting providers. If you run into this, see that issue and its related issues for details.

Handling security issues #

Starting now, any security issues discovered for Drupal 8 should be kept confidential and reported using the Report a security vulnerability link on the Drupal project page in order to protect existing sites. Through December 31, 2015, the Drupal 8 security bounty is also still active, so you can get paid for finding security issues and reporting them in our private tracker! See the security team page for more information on Drupal security.

Talk about the release candidate! #

We suggest the #drupal8rc hashtag for Twitter, Facebook, etc. posts. To mention and find conversations about work already made with Drupal 8, use #madewithd8. We can't wait to see what you make with Drupal 8!

Front page news: Drupal NewsDrupal version: Drupal 8.x

Marketplace Updates to Highlight Contributing Organizations

Drupal - Tue, 09/22/2015 - 10:28

We are excited to announce some big changes to the Drupal.org Marketplace. In Dries’ Amsterdam Keynote, he made a compelling case for showing the contributions of organizations that are helping build Drupal. By highlighting organizations that give their employees time to give back, we make it possible for more people to give time to making the project better.

In March, we took steps to begin collecting this information by allowing individuals that were contributing in the issue queues to attribute their contributions to organization that they are employed by or customers that funded the work. When a maintainer of a project (module, theme, distribution or Drupal Core) closes an issue as fixed, they have an opportunity to pass on credit to the individuals who helped contribute to fixing the issue—and not just code contributions, but any kind of feedback, review, designs, etc.

We called this system issue credits and it has been a huge success. We now show the last 90 days of issue credits awarded to an individual or organization on their profile.

Today, after months of collecting this data, we are taking how we highlight contributing organizations to a new level.

With this launch, we are removing the distinction of "featured service providers" versus "all service providers". By using data about these organizations contributions, we can provide a single list of all organizations ordered by their contributions.

For now, we are using issue credits as the primary sort. The secondary sort highlights organizations that are giving back by supporting Drupal.org through the supporting partner program or organization membership. Soon, we plan to incorporate case studies submitted, DrupalCon sponsorships, and camp sponsorships to help make a more complete picture of how organizations are contributing to our community.

Give it a look and give us your feedback.

Front page news: Drupal News

Help us test DrupalCI

Drupal - Tue, 09/15/2015 - 10:05

DrupalCI is the next generation testing infrastructure for Drupal. After years of development, DrupalCI has been rolled out for testing Drupal 8 Core and Contrib projects - and will soon be taking over testing Drupal 7 Core and Contrib as well and for Drupal 6 for the duration of its long term support window.

But we need your help!

At this time, DrupalCI is running in parallel with the existing PIFT/PIFR testing architecture. Before we retire the old testing infrastructure we want to ensure that there are no feature regressions in the new DrupalCI system, and that core and contrib developers have had time to learn the new testing architecture and try it out thoroughly.

If you are a maintainer of a contrib module with testing enabled, we will enable DrupalCI testing for your project. At this time, DrupalCI supports testing in D8 Core and Contrib, but D7 and D6 testing will be enabled soon. If you see that DrupalCI testing has been enabled for your project, please provide your feedback in the issue linked below.

To learn more about how to use DrupalCI for automated testing of your project on Drupal.org, please consult this documentation page.

How can you provide feedback?

We are collecting feedback on the new testing architecture in this issue: #2534132 - Disable Legacy Testbots and use drupalCI as our testing infrastructure. Please focus your feedback on:

  • Feature regressions from current testbots
  • Unexpected test failures
  • User interface issues
  • Test result parsing and display

Though DrupalCI is a more flexible and extensible testing architecture, we are not collecting additional feature requests at this time.

If you are a module maintainer, and you are a satisfied that the new DrupalCI tests are meeting your testing needs, you can return to the Automated Testing tab for your project and choose to disable PIFT/PIFR testing, by deleting the specific releases you no longer need tested in the old system:

Learn how to add automated testing to your project…

If you would like to add automated testing to your projects on Drupal.org you can learn more about writing tests with this tutorial.

Front page news: Drupal NewsDrupal version: Drupal 6.xDrupal 7.xDrupal 8.x

Drupal 7.39 and 6.37 released

Drupal - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 13:45

Drupal 7.39 and Drupal 6.37, maintenance releases which contain fixes for security vulnerabilities, are now available for download. See the Drupal 7.39 and Drupal 6.37 release notes for further information.

Download Drupal 7.39
Download Drupal 6.37

Upgrading your existing Drupal 7 and 6 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features or non-security-related bug fixes in these releases. For more information about the Drupal 7.x release series, consult the Drupal 7.0 release announcement. More information on the Drupal 6.x release series can be found in the Drupal 6.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 7 and 6 include the built-in Update Status module (renamed to Update Manager in Drupal 7), which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

Bug reports

Both Drupal 7.x and 6.x are being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports) more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.


Drupal 7.39 is a security release only. For more details, see the 7.39 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 6.37 is a security release only. For more details, see the 6.37 release notes. A complete list of all changes in the stable 6.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Security vulnerabilities

Drupal 7.39 and 6.37 were released in response to the discovery of security vulnerabilities. Details can be found in the official security advisory:

To fix the security problem, please upgrade to either Drupal 7.39 or Drupal 6.37.

Update notes

See the 7.39 and 6.37 release notes for details on important changes in this release.

Known issues


Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 6.xDrupal 7.x

Community Spotlight: Jibran Ijaz (Jibran)

Drupal - Wed, 08/05/2015 - 09:24

Jibran Ijaz (jibran) is a Drupal developer, and is the only Drupal Core contributor in Pakistan. A member of Drupal.org since he began building websites in 2010, Jibran has become an important member of both his local community and the greater global Drupal community. The Drupal Association spoke with Jibran over email and asked him a few questions. We’re excited to share the conversation with you.

How did you get involved with Drupal and core contribution?

Back in December 2010, I started working as a freelancer on a Drupal 6 site with a friend. It took me a while to understand all the systems like nodes, cck, views, and themes, but I was finally able to find my way. At the time, Drupal 7 RC versions had only just begun being released, so when Drupal 7.0 came out I had to learn a lot of things all over again. For me, the new built-in Entity API and Field API were difficult concepts to understand. It took me a while to understand the changes in theme layer, learn about html.tpl.php, and understand the Render API. These things were so confusing to me that I wound up submitting my first core issue related to documentation.

After going through this learning curve twice, I thought I might as well start learning Drupal 8 now. So I started hanging out in the core issue queue, and began reading a lot of Drupal 8 blog posts on Drupal planet. One day, I read that they were moving all the Drupal Core files to the Core directory and they needed help in re-rolling a lot of trivial patches. I went and found a documentation novice issue in Drupal 8 and helped fix it both for Drupal 8 and for Drupal 7. After that, I was hooked.

What do you do with Drupal these days?

I'm a senior Drupal developer for PreviousNext, where I work remotely from Lahore, Pakistan. I mostly work on large Drupal 7 sites, but lately I have started working on a Drupal 8 site as well. It's fun to work with such a great team of front-end developers, back-end developers, and project managers at PreviousNext.

In my free time, I contribute to Drupal. I do a lot of code reviews. Specifically, I love working on Views issues in Drupal 8. I have also been actively involved in a lot of contrib projects and have been helping with porting them to Drupal 8. During the weekends, I enjoy working on dynamic_entity_reference.

You’re involved with quite a variety of projects in the Drupal community and in your national Drupal community as well. Can you describe some of the things you do and why you like them?

Ever since my childhood, computers have fascinated me. Even though my bachelor's degree is in Telecommunication Engineering, I always loved coding. This means my involvement with Drupal is almost always related to coding. I enjoy solving bugs, writing patches, and performing code reviews. I also like to get involved in technical discussions related to Drupal, and really enjoy helping others understand difficult Drupal concepts, so I mentor people as well.

In Pakistan, we have a very enthusiastic Drupal community. The Drupal Association has helped us with organizing numerous camps, workshops and training opportunities in different cities all over the country. I wasn’t actively involved with local community until about a year ago when I talked to Donna Benjamin (kattekrab), who was the director of community engagement at PreviousNext at the time. Donna encouraged me to participate a lot more in my local Drupal community, so I took part in my first Drupal Camp at Lahore on 3 May 2014. I was the only core developer there, and my fellow attendees were very appreciative and welcoming. At the camp, I talked about Drupal 8, and everybody loved it. So I’ve been attending ever the Drupal Camp I can get to ever since. I was even a keynote speaker at Drupal camp Islamabad back in April.

What’s the coolest project you’ve worked on?

I have worked on a lot of Drupal projects with very complex architecture. It's always fun whenever I get to use a big module like Domain Access, Services, Commerce, Ubercart, Google Maps, or Organic Groups to build features for our clients. It's also fun when I get to build a complex architecture using Drupal API. I'd prefer not to name a specific project, though. It would feel like I'm pointing at my favorite kid.

What changes are you most looking forward to in Drupal 8?

Oh! The simple answer is everything. The change form Functional Programming to Object Oriented Programming is the most important thing for me. Personally, I also like the built-in plugins system of Drupal 8 because if you’re familiar with the plugin API, you can easily use it in Blocks, Entities, Fields, Menus, and Views. Even Drupal 8 contrib modules like Rules and Page Manager are doing a lot of amazing things with plugins.

What is your favorite thing about the Drupal community?

I love the Drupal community as whole, and am inspired by the fact that we all share the same enthusiasm towards Drupal. It doesn't matter who you are or what the scope of your technical knowledge is — anyone and everyone can make a difference in the community. I spend a lot of time with Drupal developers on IRC, at local and international Drupal events, and I haven't found a single person who isn’t kind and helpful. No matter how many times you ask the same question or a stupid question, everyone always responds very kindly. No one has ever treated me differently because of my religion or region. Every person I have met in the Drupal community has inspired me on some level, irrespective of their contribution in Drupal. That is my favorite thing about the Drupal community.

What is your most meaningful Drupal moment?

Drupal has given me a lot of beautiful moments. It's very hard to pick one, so I’ve listed several below.

1. First time I attended DrupalCon. Picture by @lsheydrupal

2. First time I met with webchick

3. First time I got a shout-out from webchick on my Drupal contributions at DrupalSouth

And there are countless other moments, like my keynote at Drupal Camp Islamabad, hanging out with VDC team at DrupalCon code sprint, meeting with the whole PreviousNext team for the first time, and dynamic_entity_reference hacking with Lee Rowlands after the DrupalSouth code sprint.

Tell us a little about your background or things that interest you outside Drupal.

Before computers, my first love was math. I like to read, but lately I haven't been able to read many books. I can speak and understand a bit of Arabic, French, and German. I love to learn new stuff and experiences new things in life. I like watching football and Formula1, and I also watch a lot of English TV series and movies. Now I know why I don't have time to read anymore. :D

Secure your account: Two Factor authentication on Drupal.org

Drupal - Sun, 07/19/2015 - 13:22

Drupal.org users* can now use Two factor authentication to increase the security of their accounts. It can be enabled via Security tab of your user profile page. Read the detailed instructions at Enabling TFA on Drupal.org.

This was made available to Drupal.org admins in May. It is now required for users who have advanced access on Drupal.org. However, every user can benefit from the security that two factor authentication offers.

If you want to make two factor authentication available on your own Drupal site, you can install the TFA module.

* Two factor authentication is available for all users with the 'confirmed user' role. If you don't see 'Security' tab on your profile page, you might be missing the role. Just keep posting content on Drupal.org and it will be granted soon. You can also apply to get the role.

Front page news: Planet Drupal

Outage: Drupal.org Git server Migration

Drupal - Wed, 07/08/2015 - 10:22

On July 9th 8pm UTC, Drupal.org will be migrating our git server to a redundant cluster of 2 servers. This will provide failover in the event one server fails.

While we are working on the migration, users will not be able to commit files to git or check files out of git. We expect the migration to take up to 2 hours.

After the migration Host keys will change and your client might give an error message when pushing to git. Consult your OS’s documentation on how to fix this error.

If you have any questions please raise an issue in the infrastructure issue queue. https://www.drupal.org/project/issues/infrastructure?categories=All

You can follow the progress of the migration at http://twitter.com/drupal_infra