Web Design and Development

A Statement from the Executive Director

Drupal - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 15:49

We understand that there is uncertainty and concern in the Drupal community about project founder, Dries Buytaert, asking Larry Garfield to leave the Drupal community, and about the Drupal Association removing Larry's DrupalCon sessions and ending his term as track chair.

We want to be clear that the decision to remove Larry's DrupalCon session and track chair role was not because of his private life or personal beliefs. The Drupal Association stands by our values of inclusivity. Our decision was based on confidential information conveyed in private by many sources. Due to the confidential nature of the situation we cannot and will not disclose any information that may harm any members of our community, including Larry.

This decision followed our established process. As the Executive Director, charged with safekeeping the goodwill of the organization, I made this decision after considering input from various sources including the Community Working Group (CWG) and Drupal Project Lead, Dries Buytaert. Upon Larry’s request for an appeal, the full board reviewed the situation, all the evidence, and statements provided by Larry. After reviewing the entirety of the information available (including information not in the public view) the decision was upheld.

In order to protect everyone involved we cannot comment more, and trust that the community will be understanding.  

We do see that there are many feelings and questions around this DrupalCon decision and we empathize with those community members. We will continue to monitor comments. We are listening.

How Drupal.org fights spam using Distil Networks

Drupal - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 07:45

This case study was written as a collaboration between Drupal Association staff and Technology Supporting Partner Distil Networks.

Drupal.org is the home of one of the largest open source communities in the world. We've been online for more than 13 years and collectively we build the Drupal software, provide support, write documentation, share networking opportunities, and more. The open source spirit pushes the Drupal project forward, and new members are always welcome. It falls to us to maintain our community home and preserve the welcoming atmosphere that leads people to say,"Come for the code, stay for the community."  

As stewards of Drupal.org, it's our responsibility to give the community a voice and welcome everyone who wants to participate in the project. At the same time, there are bad actors who would take advantage of our open community and platform for abusive purposes.

Drupal.org long-standing presence on the web has given it authority in the eyes of search engines. The site hosts millions of pages of content - all generated by our users. This combination of authority and open access for users to create content makes us a very high value target for phishers and spammers.

Spam is a nuisance to our existing community, devalues our project to the newcomers we are hoping to welcome, and left unchecked could degrade our search presence.

Challenges Spammers create bogus accounts to post their junk content

Only registered members can post content to the Drupal.org website, so there's a continuous onslaught of actors attempting to create accounts for the purpose of inserting link spam and other bad content onto the site. In the past, we've implemented a variety of strategies such as content analysis, behavioral analysis, social moderation, and rate limiting. And while these measures have been effective at reducing some of the spam we've seen, the onslaught continues.

The reason for that? Much of our attempted spam is not coming from bots. These are real people using tools to cloak their identity and manually creating accounts en masse. In many cases they may not even post junk content immediately. They will often sit on "sleeper" accounts waiting to be paid by somebody to promote malicious content.

It's too time consuming to manually remove spam content

Spam fighting is also a thankless task. All time spent fighting spam, whether by members of the engineering staff or our incredibly dedicated community volunteers, is time not spent on the project. Spam fighting has an opportunity cost that creates burn-out among staff and volunteers, and is not something we can afford to leave to manual moderation.

Especially when it comes to our community volunteers– they want to spend their time helping people with Drupal technical questions, not deleting spam.

Fake accounts and spam pollute the community engagement metrics

There are 1.9 million user accounts in the Drupal.org database, but using this data to measure community engagement is challenging because of the number of spammer accounts that have been registered over the years. When we have to work around so many illegitimate accounts, it's difficult to determine metrics for community health such as if our legitimate user growth is increasing or decreasing. We need cleaner user account data to give us more reliable community metrics, and help us make informed decisions.

The Solution

Before reaching out to Distil Networks, Drupal.org relied primarily on two modules to help us fight spam. Mollom is a Drupal stand-by—a content analysis tool that looks at what users are posting and compares them against known bad actor patterns. This content analysis helps us identify and block new waves of spam patterns, but it doesn't prevent these waves from being posted in the first place.

The second module we use is Honeypot, which uses a combination of honeypot and rate limiting methods to prevent bot spam. Honeypot does a good job in preventing mass spam attacks by bots, but when real people are creating the underlying accounts honeypot can't help us.

As we researched ways to prevent spam, we discovered that all of these bad actors we wanted to keep out had one thing in common—they are hiding their identities behind proxies. This prevents us from simply blacklisting certain ip addresses or ranges. So instead, we began researching ways to unmask the users behind these proxies and block them before they can even create an account.

Our research led us to Distil Networks. We now run the Drupal.org registration pages(and only the registration pages) through the Distil Cloud CDN. Distil's service gathers device fingerprints for the users trying to create the accounts, and we're able to leverage those fingerprints to block users who would otherwise generate dozens or hundreds of accounts by rotating through proxies. This fingerprinting process is limited to a hashed, unique identifier and only affects our registration process, to preserve the privacy of our legitimate users.

What the Distil data shows

After enabling Distil's service for our registration process we were able to capture fingerprints for about 20,000 account registrations over the course of nine months. We were immediately able to identify more than 10% of those account registrations as duplicate registrations by the same user, hiding behind a proxy. As we dug into the data further, we realized that thousands of the spam accounts that spammers are attempting to register are actually created by only 200-300 real individuals.

By blocking these 200-300 individuals by their Distil fingerprint, we can block thousands of account registrations, and tens of thousands of spam posts that would have been created had these 'sleeper accounts' been activated.

Results

Even with Distil's sophisticated profiling tool available to us, we knew that the spam fighting process would continue to have a manual component. In the first place, there are still thousands of 'sleeper' accounts registered before we implemented Distil that could be activated. And secondly, we know that we cannot simply rely on proxy detection and fingerprint collisions to identify spam accounts. Some of our users are in countries where a proxy is the only way to access a free and open internet. Other users are in environments that have identical device fingerprints and a shared IP, such as a classroom computer lab.

However, by taking advantage of the tools that Distil offers, we can now stop many of the account registrations at the source. In the same time that it once took us to moderate a single new user account that had just posted spam, we can now block a unique id that would have been used to create a dozen or even a hundred more accounts.

We've seen trends in our account registration logs that show that the new methods are working. As we block spammers in ways they can't circumvent through proxies, their ability to register multiple accounts diminishes. Without being able to mass register accounts to later activate when selling link spam, Drupal.org becomes a less viable target.

While some spam still gets through, whether from old sleeper accounts, or lucky new spammers that manage to slip by, the overall reduction in spam has been significant. This lets our volunteers and internal staff direct more of their efforts at moving the project forward, rather than fighting spam.  

With fewer illegitimate account registrations, we're also able to improve the metrics we use to measure our community health and engagement, by lowering the noise-to-signal ratio in user activity.

Conclusion

We want to thank Distil Networks for joining the Drupal Association as a Premium Technology Supporter. The tools that Distil Networks provide enable us to better take care of the home of the community. Fighting spam is a never ending challenge: as long as there is a financial incentive to posting spam, bad actors will continue to evolve their methods, but with a partner like Distil Networks we are now equipped to stay one step ahead.

To learn more about how Drupal.org and Distil Networks partnered to tackle spam, and to learn how you could leverage a similar solution for your own site, please join us at our webinar on April 5th, at 10am Pacific.

Distil Networks will be joining us at DrupalCon Baltimore from April 24-28th. We invite the community to join us there and learn more about our partnership.

Goodbye Project Applications, Hello Security Advisory Opt-in

Drupal - Fri, 03/17/2017 - 15:12

Any user on Drupal.org who has accepted our Git usage policy may now create full projects with releases. This is a big change in policy for the Drupal project, representing an evolution of the contribution ecosystem in the past half a decade.

What was the Project Application Process?

Ever since the days when Drupal's code was hosted in CVS there has been some form of project application process in the Drupal Community. To prevent duplicate, low-quality, insecure, or otherwise undesirable projects from flooding Drupal, users would submit sandbox projects to an application queue to be reviewed by a group of volunteers.

After resolving any issues raised in this review process, the user would be given the git vetted role, allowing them to promote their sandbox to a full project, claim a namespace, and create releases. Once a user had been vetted for their first project, they would remain vetted and be able to promote any future projects on their own, without submitting an additional application.

The Problem

Unfortunately, though the project application process was created with the best of intentions, in the long term it proved not to be sustainable. Drupal grew too fast for a group of volunteer reviewers to keep up with reviewing new projects, and at times there were applications waiting in queue for 6 months to 1 year, or even more. That is much too slow in the world of software development.

This put Drupal in a difficult situation. After years of subjecting new projects and contributors to a rigorous standard of peer review, Drupal has a well-deserved reputation for code quality and security. Unlike many open source projects, we largely avoided the problem of having many duplicate modules that exist to serve the same purpose. We unified our community’s effort, and kept up a culture of collaboration and peer review. At the same time, many would-be contributors were unable or unwilling to navigate the application process and so simply chose not to contribute.

The question became, how could we preserve the emphasis on quality while at the same time removing the barrier to contribution that the application process had become?

Constraints on a solution

Opening the contribution gates while retaining strong signals about code quality and security was a tricky problem. We established three constraints on a solution:

  1. We need to welcome new contributors, and eliminate the walls that prevent contribution.
  2. We need to continue to send strong signals about security coverage to users evaluating whether to use modules from Drupal.org.
  3. We need to continue our strong emphasis on quality and collaboration through changes to project discovery that will provide new signals about code quality, and by providing incentives and credit for peer review.
The Solution

In collaboration with the community, the security team, members of the board, and staff we outlined a solution in four phases:

Phase 1: Send strong signals about security advisory coverage.
  • We updated project pages to include messaging and a shield icon to indicate whether a project received security advisory coverage from the security team.
  • We now serve security advisory coverage information in the Updates status information provided by Drupal.org, and we're working on a patch to display that information directly on the updates page of users' Drupal sites.

Here are some examples of what these security signals look like on project pages:

If a project is not opted in to security advisory coverage, this message will appear at the top of the project page:

And this one will appear near the download table:

If a project has opted in, this message will appear near the download table:

And covered releases will show the coverage icon (note how the stable 7.x release has coverage and the 8.x release candidate does not):

Phase 2: Set up an opt-in process for security advisory coverage
  • Previously any project with a stable release would receive security advisory coverage from the security team. As we opened the gates for anyone to promote full projects, the security team needed an opt in process so that they could enforce an extra level of vetting on projects that wish to receive advisory coverage.
  • We agreed to repurpose the project application queue to be a queue for vetting users for the ability to opt their projects in to receive security advisory coverage. Now that this process has been decoupled from creating full projects, the security team may revise it in future–in collaboration with staff and the community.
  • Now a project maintainer must opt in their project to receive advisory coverage and make a stable release in order to receive security advisory coverage from the security team.

Once a maintainer has been vetted by the security advisory opt in process, they can edit their project and use this field set to opt-in:

Phase 3: Open the gate to allow users to create full projects with releases without project applications.

This is the milestone we've just reached!

Phase 4: Provide both automated code quality signals, as well as incentives for peer review of projects - and factor these into project discovery
  • We are working on this phase of the project in the issue queues, and we appreciate your feedback and ideas!
What is the new process?

So in the end - what is the new process if you want to make a contribution by hosting a project on Drupal.org?

  1. You must have a Drupal.org account, and you must accept the git terms of service.
  2. You can create a sandbox or a full project
  • Note: We still strongly recommend that project maintainers begin with sandbox projects, until they are sure they will be able to commit to supporting the project as a full project, and until the code is nearly ready for an initial release.
  • That said, you can promote a sandbox project to a full project at any time, to reserve your name space and begin making releases.

At this point, you will have a full project on Drupal.org, and will be able to make releases that anyone can use on their Drupal site. The project will not receive security advisory coverage, and a warning that the project is not covered will appear on the project page and in the updates information.

If you want to receive security advisory coverage for your project, you will need to take these additional steps:

  1. You must apply for vetted status in the security advisory coverage queue.
  2. Members of the security team or other volunteers will review your application - and may suggest changes to your project.
  3. Once feedback is resolved, you will be granted the vetted role and be able to opt in this project, and any future projects you create, to receive security advisory coverage.
    • Note: Only *stable* releases receive security advisory coverage, so even after opting your project in you will not receive the advisory coverage shield except on stable releases.
What comes next?

Now that the project application process is no more, the gates are open. We are already seeing an uptick in projects created on Drupal.org, and have seen some projects that had migrated to other places (like GitHub) migrate back to Drupal.org. We can expect to see contributions from some great developers who previously felt gate-kept out of the community. We will also see an uptick in contributions that need work, from new developers and others who are still learning Drupal best practices.

That is why our next focus will be on providing good code quality signals for projects on Drupal.org. We want to provide both automated signals of code quality, and new incentives for peer review from existing members of the community. We're outlining that plan in the issue queues, and we welcome your feedback and contributions.

We also still have work to do to communicate this well. This is a big change for the Drupal community and so we want to make people aware of this change in every channel that we can.

Finally, after such a significant change, we're going to need to monitor the contrib ecosystem closely. We're going to learn a lot about the project in the next several months, and it's likely there will be additional follow ups and other changes that we'll need to make.  

Special Thanks

There are many, many contributors on Drupal.org who have put in time and effort to help make the contribution process better for new contributors to Drupal - the deepest thanks to all of you for your insight and feedback. We'd also like to specifically thank those who participated in the Project Application Revamp, including:

Drupal Core - Multiple Vulnerabilities - SA-CORE-2017-001

Drupal - Wed, 03/15/2017 - 12:24

Drupal 8.2.7, a maintenance release which contains fixes for security vulnerabilities, is now available for download.

Download Drupal 8.2.7

Upgrading your existing Drupal 8 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features nor non-security-related bug fixes in this release. See the 8.2.7 release notes for details on important changes and known issues affecting this release. Read on for details of the security vulnerabilities that were fixed in this release.

  • Advisory ID: DRUPAL-SA-CORE-2017-001
  • Project: Drupal core
  • Version: 8.x
  • Date: 2017-March-15
Description Editor module incorrectly checks access to inline private files - Drupal 8 - Access Bypass - Critical - CVE-2017-6377

When adding a private file via a configured text editor (like CKEditor), the editor will not correctly check access for the file being attached, resulting in an access bypass.

Some admin paths were not protected with a CSRF token - Drupal 8 - Cross Site Request Forgery - Moderately Critical - CVE-2017-6379

Some administrative paths did not include protection for CSRF. This would allow an attacker to disable some blocks on a site. This issue is mitigated by the fact that users would have to know the block ID.

Remote code execution - Drupal 8 - Remote code execution - Moderately Critical - CVE-2017-6381

A 3rd party development library including with Drupal 8 development dependencies is vulnerable to remote code execution.

This is mitigated by the default .htaccess protection against PHP execution, and the fact that Composer development dependencies aren't normal installed.

You might be vulnerable to this if you are running a version of Drupal before 8.2.2. To be sure you aren’t vulnerable, you can remove the /vendor/phpunit directory from the site root of your production deployments.

Solution

Upgrade to Drupal 8.2.7

Reported by Editor module incorrectly checks access to inline private files - Drupal 8 - Access Bypass - Critical - CVE-2017-6377 Some admin paths were not protected with a CSRF token - Drupal 8 - Cross Site Request Forgery - Moderately Critical - CVE-2017-6379 Remote code execution - Drupal 8 - Remote code execution - Moderately Critical - CVE-2017-6381 Fixed by Editor module incorrectly checks access to inline private files - Drupal 8 - Access Bypass - Critical - CVE-2017-6377 Some admin paths were not protected with a CSRF token - Drupal 8 - Cross Site Request Forgery - Moderately Critical - CVE-2017-6379 Remote code execution - Drupal 8 - Remote code execution -Moderately Critical - CVE-2017-6381 Contact and More Information

The Drupal security team can be reached at security at drupal.org or via the contact form at https://www.drupal.org/contact.

Learn more about the Drupal Security team and their policies, writing secure code for Drupal, and securing your site.

Follow the Drupal Security Team on Twitter at https://twitter.com/drupalsecurity

Making Drupal upgrades easy forever

Drupal - Tue, 03/14/2017 - 09:16

Republished from buytaert.net, please post your comments there.

One of the key reasons that Drupal has been successful is because we always made big, forward-looking changes. As a result, Drupal is one of very few CMSes that has stayed relevant for 15+ years. The downside is that with every major release of Drupal, we've gone through a lot of pain adjusting to these changes. The learning curve and difficult upgrade path from one major version of Drupal to the next (e.g. from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8) has also held back Drupal's momentum. In an ideal world, we'd be able to innovate fast yet provide a smooth learning curve and upgrade path from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9. We believe we've found a way to do both!

Upgrading from Drupal 8.2 to Drupal 8.3

Before we can talk about the upgrade path to Drupal 9, it's important to understand how we do releases in Drupal 8. With the release of Drupal 8, we moved Drupal core to use a continuous innovation model. Rather than having to wait for years to get new features, users now get sizeable advances in functionality every six months. Furthermore, we committed to providing a smooth upgrade for modules, themes, and distributions from one six-month release to the next.

This new approach is starting to work really well. With the 8.1 and 8.2 updates behind us and 8.3 close to release, we have added some stable improvements like BigPipe and a new status report page, as well as experimental improvements for outside-in, workflowslayouts, and more. We also plan to add important media improvements in 8.4.

Most importantly, upgrading from 8.2 to 8.3 for these new features is not much more complicated than simply updating for a bugfix or security release.

Upgrading from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9

After a lot of discussion among the Drupal core committers and developers, and studying projects like Symfony, we believe that the advantages of Drupal's minor upgrade model (e.g. from Drupal 8.2 to Drupal 8.3) can be translated to major upgrades (e.g. from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9). We see a way to keep innovating while providing a smooth upgrade path and learning curve from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9.

Here is how we will accomplish this: we will continue to introduce new features and backwards-compatible changes in Drupal 8 releases. In the process, we sometimes have to deprecate the old systems. Instead of removing old systems, we will keep them in place and encourage module maintainers to update to the new systems. This means that modules and custom code will continue to work. The more we innovate, the more deprecated code there will be in Drupal 8. Over time, maintaining backwards compatibility will become increasingly complex. Eventually, we will reach a point where we simply have too much deprecated code in Drupal 8. At that point, we will choose to remove the deprecated systems and release that as Drupal 9.

This means that Drupal 9.0 should be almost identical to the last Drupal 8 release, minus the deprecated code. It means that when modules take advantage of the latest Drupal 8 APIs and avoid using deprecated code, they should work on Drupal 9. Updating from Drupal 8's latest version to Drupal 9.0.0 should be as easy as updating between minor versions of Drupal 8. It also means that Drupal 9 gives us a clean slate to start innovating more rapidly again.

Why would you upgrade to Drupal 9 then? For the great new features in 9.1. No more features will be added to Drupal 8 after Drupal 9.0. Instead, they will go into Drupal 9.1, 9.2, and so on.

To get the most out of this new approach, we need to make two more improvements. We need to change core so that the exact same module can work with Drupal 8 and 9 if the module developer uses the latest APIs. We also need to provide full data migration from Drupal 6, 7 and 8 to any future release. So long as we make these changes before Drupal 9 and contributed or custom modules take advantage of the latest Drupal 8 APIs, up-to-date sites and modules may just begin using 9.0.0 the day it is is released.

What does this mean for Drupal 7 users?

If you are one of the more than a million sites successfully running on Drupal 7, you might only have one more big upgrade ahead of you.

If you are planning to migrate directly from Drupal 7 to Drupal 9, you should reconsider that approach. In this new model, it might be more beneficial to upgrade to Drupal 8. Once you’ve migrated your site to Drupal 8, subsequent upgrades will be much simpler.

We have more work to do to complete the Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 data migration, but the first Drupal 8 minor release that fully supports it could be 8.4.0, scheduled to be released in October 2017.

What does this mean for Drupal developers?

If you are a module or theme developer, you can continually update to the latest APIs each minor release. Avoid using deprecated code and your module will be compatible with Drupal 9 the day Drupal 9 is released. We have plans to make it easy for developers to identify and update deprecated code.

What does this mean for Drupal core contributors?

If you are a Drupal core contributor and want to introduce new improvements in Drupal core, Drupal 8 is the place to do it! With backwards compatibility layers, even pretty big changes are possible in Drupal 8.

When will Drupal 9 will be released?

We don't know yet, but it shouldn't matter as much either. Innovative Drupal 8 releases will go out on schedule every six months and upgrading to Drupal 9 should become easy. I don't believe we will release Drupal 9 any time soon; we have plenty of features in the works for Drupal 8. Once we know more, we'll follow up with more details.

Thank you

Special thanks to Alex Bronstein, Alex Pott, Gábor Hojtsy, Nathaniel Catchpole and Jess (xjm) for their contributions to this post.

DrupalCon Baltimore: Learn how to delight your customers

Drupal - Mon, 03/13/2017 - 07:24

Join us at DrupalCon Baltimore from April 24-28 for a week of inspiration, networking, and learning. Meet Drupal experts and industry leaders who will share new ways to create digital experiences that delight customers, citizens, students, patients, and more.

The event offers programming for decision makers (CIO/Director) as well as digital teams (developers, project managers, site builders, content strategists). Be sure to check out these suggested sessions for both audiences.

Top Five Reasons To Attend DrupalCon
  • Get inspired! Hear Dries Buytaert’s vision for digital transformation and Drupal.
  • Network with peers at 4 industry summits and case study sessions on Bluecross Blueshield, Cornell University, Mass.gov, NBA, Quicken, YMCA, and more.
  • Level up your team's skill with 10 trainings and 161 sessions taught by Drupal masters.
  • Find solution partners. Visit the exhibit hall to meet Drupal’s robust vendor ecosystem.
  • Be Amazed. Meet the open source community that powers Drupal.

Register today. Prices increase March 24th. Attendees can come for the week or just for a day. Plus, the Baltimore Convention Center is easy to reach - just 30 minutes from Baltimore Washington Airport and 15 minutes from the Amtrak Station.

We look forward to seeing you at DrupalCon Baltimore!

What’s new on Drupal.org? - February 2017

Drupal - Thu, 03/09/2017 - 08:17

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

Drupal.org updates Industry Pages Launched

After a great deal of preparation, user research, and content development we've launched the first three 'Drupal in your Industry' pages. These first three pages highlight the power of Drupal in Media and Publishing, Higher Education, and Government. Each of these pages uses geo-targeted content to reach audiences in: the Americas; Europe, the Middle East, and Africa; and the Asia Pacific, Australia and New Zealand regions.

These pages are targeted at evaluators of Drupal in these specific industries. From our research, we've found that these evaluators typically have Drupal on their short list of technology choices, but are not familiar with how a complete solution is built on Drupal, and they're eager to see success stories from their industry peers.

We'll be expanding on this initiative with additional industry pages as time goes on.

Project Application Revamp

In February we completed phases 1 and 2 of the Project Application Process Revamp. This has meant polishing up the security advisory coverage messages that are provided on project pages, adding a new field for vetted users to opt-in to advisory coverage for their projects, and adding security advisory coverage information to the updates xml served from Drupal.org. With these issues complete we'll be able to move forward with Phase 3 (opening the project promotion gates) and Phase 4 (improving code quality signals and incentivizing peer review) as we roll into March.

[Author's note] The project application revamp hit a major milestone in early March with the completion of Phase 3. Now, any user who has accepted the git terms of service may now promote sandbox projects to full projects with releases, and the application process has been re-purposed for vetting users who want the ability to opt into security advisory coverage for their projects. Look for more information in our upcoming March post.

2017 Community Elections are Live

On February 1 we opened self-nominations for one of the two community-at-large seats on the Drupal Association Board of Directors. At the time of this post, self-nominations have closed and now it's time to vote!.

Each year we make incremental improvements to the elections process. This year we've allowed each candidate to present a short 'statement of candidacy' video - and we've updated the ballot to allow easy drag-and-drop ranking of candidates.

Voting closes on March 18th, so make sure to vote soon!

Documentation polish, and new "call-out" templates

As the migration of content into the new documentation system continues, we've continued to polish and improve the tools. In February we made a few small improvements including: help text for maintainers and fixes for links to the discuss page in email notifications. We also made one large improvement: Call-out templates for highlighting warning information or version-specific notes within a documentation page. These templates are available using the CKEditor Templates button when editing any documentation page.

The documentation editor may select from the 'Warning note' template, which will highlight cautionary information in a visually distinct orange section on the page, or the 'Version-specific note' template, which allows users to highlight information that may only be relevant to a specific minor release of Drupal.

Here are two examples of what the call-outs will look like to a documentation reader.

DrupalCI Coding standards testing

DrupalCI continues to accelerate the pace of Drupal development as we make the system more efficient and add new features. In February we enhanced the coding standards testing that was added DrupalCI in January. Using PHPCodeSniffer, ESlint, and CSSlint coding standards results are available in the test results' Build Artifacts directory, including automatically generated patches to fix found issues. We've also begun displaying summary information about coding standards testing on Drupal.org test results. Again we'd like to thank community contributor mile23 for his work on this feature.

More useful error output

We also made DrupalCI's error output more detailed, to make it more immediately clear to developers what the issue with a particular patch might be. Developers will now see messages on the test result bubbles, for example a 'patch failed to apply' error rather than a generic 'CI error' message.

Community Initiatives Contrib Documentation Migration

We want to continue to encourage Project maintainers to create documentation guides on their projects using the new documentation content types. Maintainers can then migrate their old documentation content into these new guides, or create new documentation pages. For more information about this process, please consult our guide to contrib documentation.

Help port Dreditor features to Drupal.org

Are you a Drupal.org power user who relies on Dreditor? Markcarver is currently leading the charge to port Dreditor features to Drupal.org, and invites anyone interested in contributing to join him in #dreditor on freenode IRC or the Dreditor GitHub.

Infrastructure Special note: Drupal Association seeks Infrastructure Services vendor

We'd also like to announce a Request for Information. The Drupal Association seeks an infrastructure services vendor to help us manage the underlying infrastructure that supports Drupal.org, our sub-sites, and the services we maintain. Our internal engineering team will continue to manage the sites and services themselves, while this vendor will help us with systems administration, virtual machine management, monitoring and pager responsibilities, disaster recovery, etc.

For more details about this request for information, please see our post on the Association blog.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects. If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association. Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

The full circle of Drupal adoption

Drupal - Tue, 03/07/2017 - 16:04

The Engineering Team provides support to many community members and everyone at the Association. Every day, the team helps people who are at different stages of the Drupal adoption journey. As part of our membership campaign, we're taking a close look at how the team makes an impact throughout this cycle through the work to support a few different Association programs.

Industry Pages: convincing decision makers to adopt Drupal

The team played a key role in the Industry Pages project—from conception to execution. The industry pages help decision makers see how Drupal achieves the vision Dries' set forth when he described Drupal as the platform for ambitious digital experiences.

The first three industry pages for media and publishing, higher education, and government are now on Drupal.org. These pages tell stories of success with Drupal for three verticals with geo-targeted content to show our global audience the solutions that are most meaningful to them. We plan to learn from this project and to expand into new verticals. By highlighting what Drupal can do for you, and connecting decision makers to service providers and industry peers, the industry pages are a powerful tool for leading the way to wider adoption.

Drupal Jobs: wider adoption leads to more career opportunities

The team is responsible for Drupal Jobs, the subsite dedicated to helping employers and job seekers connect for Drupal-related opportunities. Ever since Drupal Jobs launched in 2015, it has helped increase awareness of the Drupal project. As the pool of employers grows, so do the career opportunities. When more Drupal jobs are available, our ecosystem grows. Wider Drupal adoption becomes possible.

DrupalCon: Events site brings us full circle

DrupalCon unites our global community and people who want to know more about the project. On the Events site, the engineering team supports everyone—event organizers who post content, speakers who submit sessions, and attendees who register using Drupal Commerce and CoD. With a great UX on con sites and fun theme implementation, we show users what Drupal can do for you.

Around we go, thanks for coming along

As the adoption journey goes full circle and we see these efforts continue to help maintain and grow a strong ecosystem, we appreciate that you are coming along with us. To help sustain the work of the Drupal Association, join as a member. Thank you!

It's Time To Vote - Community Elections

Drupal - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 14:55

Voting is now open for the 2017 At-Large Board positions for the Drupal Association!  If you haven't yet, check out the candidate profiles including their short videos found on the profile pages. Get to know your candidates, and then get ready vote.

Cast Your Vote!

How does voting work? Voting is open to all individuals who have a Drupal.org account by the time nominations open and who have logged in at least once in the past year.

To vote, you will rank candidates in order of your preference (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.). The results will be calculated using an "instant runoff" method. For an accessible explanation of how instant runoff vote tabulation works, see videos linked in this discussion.

Elections will be held from 6 March, 2017 through 18 March, 2017. During this period, you can review and comment on the candidate profiles.

Have questions? Please contact me: Megan Sanicki

Saving time and money for the Drupal community

Drupal - Thu, 03/02/2017 - 15:20

As you know, we've been highlighting the work of the Drupal Association Engineering Team during our membership campaign. Every day, this small team moves the needle forward so that we all have a better experience as users of Drupal.org. In this post, we explore how the team's recent work results in faster, less expensive Drupal development.  

Helping Drupal development move faster with DrupalCI

DrupalCI testbots are the next generation of testing infrastructure for Drupal.org, funded by the Drupal Association and maintained by the Engineering team. For any project on the site, DrupalCI testing can be enabled from the Automated Testing link on the Project page. Every time a contribution to the Drupal project needs to be tested, DrupalCI spins up a testbot on AWS to test those changes. The DrupalCI testbots are helping Drupal contributors to test patches faster than ever before and they are more cost effective than our last generation testbots, both in price-per-test and in expense to maintain.

In recent months, we've added a number of new features including:

We're proud to say that our work on DrupalCI has increased the speed of Drupal development, saving time and money!

We'd also like to thank the volunteers who've helped us to bring this project to life: Mile23, jthorson, nick_schuch, dasrecht, ricardoamaro, mikey_p, chx, shyamala, webchick, and jhedstrom.

Want to keep up with the engineering team? Subscribe to change notifications so you can see ongoing improvements.

Making the greatest impact with member and donor funds with a leaner Drupal.org

Drupal.org is more portable and maintainable because of updates in 2016 that streamline our infrastructure. We've virtualized the majority of the infrastructure and standardized on Debian 8 images. We've also updated our configuration and user management from Puppet 3 + LDAP to Puppet 4 + Hiera. Dev sites are more robust and we can create staging and development environments faster than before.

All of this makes Drupal.org more cost-effective to run, easier to maintain, and increases our development velocity when we're working on new features to support the community. These efficiencies help to conserve membership and donor funds for other programs to help the Drupal community, like fiscal sponsorship for camps, and Community Cultivation Grants.

Improving developers' lives by supporting Composer workflows for Drupal

Composer is the defacto standard for managing dependencies in the PHP world. Over the course of 2016, the Drupal Association Engineering Team developed Composer endpoints for Drupal allowing Drupal developers to use Composer to manage dependencies, and allowing PHP developers at large to manage Drupal as part of their larger PHP projects in this standard workflow.

Composer is a force multiplier for enterprise site owners and developers within the Drupal community and at large. By supporting Composer, we've further opened Drupal to the wider PHP community, thus bringing new people into the fold to contribute.

A big thanks to everyone who helped with Composer: seldeak - the creator of Composer and Packagist.org, webflo - the creator and maintainer of http://packagist.drupal-composer.org, timmillwood, dixon_, badjava, cweagans, tstoeckler, mile23, and also Appnovation, who sponsored the initial development of Drupal.org's composer endpoints.

A more secure home for the Drupal community

Keeping Drupal.org secure is also the responsibility of the Drupal Association Engineering Team (though we rely on some trusted volunteers to help - thanks, mlhess and basic!). From heartbleed, to dirtycow, to cloudbleed - the team is always ready to respond when a vulnerability is disclosed. But the team is not just reactive - they also take proactive steps to keep Drupal.org and all our users' data safe. From ensuring that most of our servers are only available to each other on a back-end network, to putting in protections against DDOS attacks, to building anti-spam tools to prevent bad actors from registering accounts on the site- the Engineering Team is looking to prevent problems before they happen.

We'll keep at it, with your support

Every day, we're on call to keep Drupal.org running and improving. The list of small changes we make to have a big impact on your Drupal.org experience grows by the day. You can help sustain the work of the Drupal Association by joining as a member. Thank you!

Drupal 8.3.0-rc1 is available for testing

Drupal - Wed, 03/01/2017 - 08:50

The first release candidate for the upcoming Drupal 8.3.0 release is now available for testing. Drupal 8.3.0 is expected to be released April 5.

Download Drupal-8.3.0-rc1

8.3.x includes new experimental modules for workflows, layout discovery and field layouts; raises stability of the BigPipe module to stable and the Migrate module to beta; and includes several REST, content moderation, authoring experience, performance, and testing improvements among other things. You can read a detailed list of improvements in the announcements of alpha1 and beta1.

What does this mean to me? For Drupal 8 site owners

The final bugfix release of 8.2.x has been released. A final security release window for 8.2.x is scheduled for March 15, but 8.2.x will receive no further releases following 8.3.0, and sites should prepare to update from 8.2.x to 8.3.x in order to continue getting bug and security fixes. Use update.php to update your 8.2.x sites to the 8.3.x series, just as you would to update from (e.g.) 8.2.4 to 8.2.5. You can use this release candidate to test the update. (Always back up your data before updating sites, and do not test updates in production.)

For module and theme authors

Drupal 8.3.x is backwards-compatible with 8.2.x. However, it does include internal API changes and API changes to experimental modules, so some minor updates may be required. Review the change records for 8.3.x, and test modules and themes with the release candidate now.

For translators

Some text changes were made since Drupal 8.2.0. Localize.drupal.org automatically offers these new and modified strings for translation. Strings are frozen with the release candidate, so translators can now update translations.

For core developers

All outstanding issues filed against 8.2.x were automatically migrated to 8.3.x. Future bug reports should be targeted against the 8.3.x branch. 8.4.x will remain open for new development during the 8.3.x release candidate phase. For more information, see the release candidate phase announcement.

Your bug reports help make Drupal better!

Release candidates are a chance to identify bugs for the upcoming release, so help us by searching the issue queue for any bugs you find, and filing a new issue if your bug has not been reported yet.

Meet the Drupal Association At-Large Board Member Candidates

Drupal - Fri, 02/24/2017 - 13:59

Did you know you have a say in who is on the Drupal Association Board? Each year, the Drupal community votes in a member who serves two years on the board. It’s your chance to decide which community voice you want to represent you in discussions that set the strategic direction for the Drupal Association. Go here for more details.

Voting takes place from March 6 - March 18. Anyone who has a Drupal.org profile page and has logged in to their account in the last year is eligible to vote. This year, there are many candidates from around the world. Now it’s time for you to meet them.

Meet the candidates

We just concluded the phase where 13 candidates nominated themselves for the board seat. From now through March 4, 2017 we encourage you to check out each person’s candidate profile, where they explain which board discussion topics they are most passionate about and what perspectives they will bring to the board.

This year, we asked candidates to include a short video - a statement of candidacy - that summarizes why you should vote for them. Be sure to check them out. Videos are found in the candidate’s profile as well as here:

What To Consider

When reviewing the candidates, it is helpful to know what the board is focusing on over the next year or two, so you can decide who can best represent you.

Here are the key topics the board will focus on.

  • Strengthening Drupal Association’s sustainability. The board discusses how the Association can improve its financial health while expanding its mission work.

  • Understanding what the Project needs to move forward and determine how the Association can help meet those needs through Drupal.org and DrupalCon.

  • Growing Drupal adoption through our own channels and partner channels.

  • Developing the strategic direction for DrupalCon and Drupal.org.

There are certain duties that a candidate must be able to perform as a board member. The three legal obligations are duty of care, duty of loyalty, and duty of obedience. In addition to these legal obligations, there is a lot of practical work that the board undertakes. These generally fall under the fiduciary responsibilities and include:

  • Overseeing Financial Performance

  • Setting Strategy

  • Setting and Reviewing Legal Policies

  • Fundraising

  • Managing the Executive Director

Hopefully providing this context gives you a helpful way to assess the candidates as you decide how to vote from March 6 - March 18.

We encourage you to ask the candidates questions. Use comments to leave a question on their candidate profile page.

Doing our part for the community

Drupal - Thu, 02/23/2017 - 09:25

The Drupal Association Engineering Team delivers value to all who are using, building, and developing Drupal. The team is tasked with keeping Drupal.org and all of the 20 subsites and services up and running. Their work would not be possible without the community and the project would not thrive without close collaboration. This is why we are running a membership campaign all about the engineering team. These are a few of the recent projects where engineering team + community = win!

Want to hear more about the work of the team, rather than read about it? Check out this video from 11:15-22:00 where Tim Lehnen (@hestenet) talks about the team's recent and current work.

Leading the Documentation System migration

We now have a new system for Documentation. These are guides Drupal developers and users need to effectively build and use Drupal. The new system replaces the book outline structure with a guides system, where a collection of pages with their own menu are maintained by the people who volunteer to keep the guides updated, focused, and relevant. Three years of work from the engineering team and community collaborators paid off. Content strategy, design, user research, implementation, usability testing and migration have brought this project to life.


Pages include code 'call-outs' for point-version specific information or warnings.

Thanks to the collaborators: 46 have signed up to be guide maintainers, the Documentation Working Group members (batigolix, LeeHunter, ifrik, eojthebrave), to tvn, and the many community members who write the docs!

Enabling Drupal contribution everywhere

Helping contributors is what we do best. Here are some recent highlights from the work we're doing to help the community:

Our project to help contributors currently in development is revamping the project applications process. More on this soon on our blog.

When a community need doesn't match our roadmap

We have a process for prioritizing community initiatives so we can still help contributors. Thanks to volunteers who have proposed and helped work on initiatives recently, we've supported the launch of the Drupal 8 User guide and the ongoing effort to bring Dreditor features into Drupal.org itself.  

Thanks to the collaborators: jhodgdon, eojthebrave, and the contributors to the user guide. Thanks also to markcarver for the Dreditor effort.

How to stay informed and support our work.

The change list and the Drupal.org roadmap help you to see what the board and staff have prioritized out of the many needs of the community.

You can help sustain the work of the Drupal Association by joining as a member. Thank you!

Drupal Association membership campaign: February 20 to March 8

Drupal - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 10:51

Drupal.org is home of the Drupal project and the Drupal community. It has been continuously operating since 2001. The Engineering Team— along with amazing community webmasters— keeps Drupal.org alive and well. As we launch the first membership campaign of 2017, our story is all about this small and productive team.

Join us as we celebrate all that the engineering team has accomplished. From helping grow Drupal adoption, to enabling contribution; improving infrastructure to making development faster. The team does a lot of good for the community, the project, and Drupal.org.

Check out some of their accomplishments and if you aren't yet a Drupal Association member, join us! Help us continue the work needed to make Drupal.org better, every day.

Share these stories with others - now until our membership drive ends on March 8.

Share

Tweet

Share

Thank you for supporting our work!

Drupal.org Industry Pages Are Live!

Drupal - Tue, 02/14/2017 - 15:30

We are excited to announce that the first three industry pages are now live on Drupal.org, highlighting the power of Drupal solutions in higher education, government and media/publishing. The pages are designed to quickly inform and inspire technical evaluators and connect them to service providers and technology vendors who can help them move further through their Drupal adoption journey.

The Drupal Association is incredibly proud to showcase the Drupal community’s innovation, creativity, and ability to solve end users’ challenging problems. More importantly, these pages are a resource that Drupal businesses can point to as they convince potential clients that Drupal is the right choice for them. We know this is a needed resource not only because Drupal agencies have asked for this, but because our user research was resoundingly positive. One government digital director said “I wish this was around when I was pitching my state CIO on Drupal”.

This launch is the first phase for this initiative. We will learn and iterate to keep improving the pages and we will expand the industries to include pages like healthcare, finance, ecommerce, and more.

The Research We Used

Building the industry pages was a community effort. Drupal Association staff framed the concept and then reached out to end-users of Drupal in these industries, service providers who've built solutions for these markets, and the community at large. We listened to all of you who shared your thoughts in the original blog post about this initiative.

We conducted user research, interviewing decision makers and influencers at end user organizations to make sure the pages resonated strongly with them. We talked to organizations like Weather.com, Burda Media, State of North Carolina, Georgia Technology Authority, Duke University, Cornell University - and more!

We also talked to people at agencies who pitch Drupal solutions all day long such as Acquia, Ashday, Blackmesh, Digital Echidna, FFW, Forum One, ImageX Media, Kwall, Lingotek, Lullabot, Palantir.net, Pantheon, and Phase2.

We will continue to take feedback from our global community. Our goal is to keep iterating on these industry pages as we learn more.

About The Pages

The industry pages are part of the About Drupal section and they are promoted from the Drupal.org front page. The homepage of Drupal.org receives about 350,000 visits a month, and about 50% of those visitors are new to Drupal.org The front page is primarily technical evaluators coming to learn more about Drupal and we see this as they click on our evaluator resources like About Drupal, TryDrupal, and Case Studies.

Based on user research, we know that before someone comes to the industry pages, they likely know that Drupal is an open source community-built CMS and their organization is leaning towards an open source solution. However, we did make sure the pages do not assume the visitor already knows what Drupal is, because some will find the page through search.

Another key feature is geo-targeting. Currently, we serve localized content for the Americas, EMEA, and AP/Australia/New Zealand regions. This allows us to showcase case studies that will resonate to visitors based on their location. For example, on the Americas page, we highlight the Department of Energy - a U.S federal agency. In EMEA, we highlight City of London - a UK city, and in AP/Australia/New Zealand we highlight the State Revenue Office of Victoria, Australia - a federal agency.  We took this approach because business owners at digital agencies from each region said that having localized brand names and case studies helps them convince their potential clients that Drupal is a viable option for them.

The Story We Are Telling

The story that the pages tell to visitors is:

  1. Drupal is the open source CMS of choice for this industry. Just look at the strong adoption rate, industry brand names, and their success stories.

  2. Build amazing Drupal solutions to solve problems related to your industry.

  3. Solutions are made up of Drupal and third party software and hosting solutions. Plus, you can use industry-specific distributions to accelerate your build.

  4. Because of Drupal’s extensibility and our robust ecosystem of third-party technology integrations, modules, Drupal hosting, and distributions, you can tailor a solution to solve your unique problems or create new opportunities. Check out some featured industry-specific vendors.

  5. Read case studies to learn how big names in your industry achieved business gains with a Drupal solution.

  6. These solutions were built by people at well-respected Drupal agencies who are top contributors to Drupal.

  7. If you want to talk to someone about creating a Drupal solution, fill out the form and all three will contact you.

  8. Want to meet your peers? Attend the industry summit at DrupalCon Baltimore.

For the Americas region we have secured partners for Drupal evaluators to reach out to discuss their industry needs. However, we have not yet secured agency and vendor sponsors for these pages. It takes a lot of work to line up those relationships and tee-up the content and we wanted to launch sooner than later so we could start learning how to optimize the pages. So for now, we've selected initial case study content for these regions, and we are promoting a link to the marketplace to show agencies who have industry experience in these regions. Over time, we will open up the opportunity for agencies to sponsor the pages similar to our approach in the Americas region.

Thank you to our sponsors

Contribution comes in three forms: Time, Talent, and Treasure. Many people shared their time and talent to help us create these pages for the community. We could not have built something of value without them. And, there were several companies who contributed treasure as well by investing financially to sponsor these pages. Those companies are: Acquia, Ashday, Blackmesh, Digital Echidna, FFW, Forum One, ImageX Media, Kwall, Lingotek, Lullabot, Palantir.net, Pantheon, and Phase2.

Because the industry pages give premier visibility and sponsorship is so limited, we wanted to be as fair as possible when opening up this sponsorship opportunity. As we say amongst staff, we want to “sell with a soul”. We decided to only sell these sponsorship opportunities to those who are top contributors. We looked at companies’ code contribution levels and how long they supported the Drupal Association financially and came up with an internal ranking system. Only those above a certain threshold were invited to sponsor.

This means that not only are these sponsors contributing time, talent, and treasure to this specific initiative, but they are long time contributors to the Project, helping Drupal thrive over time. It’s important to the Association that we highlight and reward good Drupal citizenship. When good Drupal citizens are doing well, we all do well. When successful, businesses can hire more Drupal talent and sponsor their contributions back to the Project. They can fund more camps and DrupalCon so we can unite and accelerate the Project in person, and they can fund Drupal.org hosting and engineers so the community can build the Project together online. We are thankful for our sponsors' generous giving and proud to work with them on this initiative.

We've created value together

We see this initiative as a great demonstration of serving our mission - “to unite the community to help them build and promote the software”. We united members from all facets of the community: end-users, service providers, and the community at large. The pages promote the software by showing that Drupal is a winning choice for evaluators in these key industries.

This project is a reflection of Drupal’s amazing spirit and culture of respecting diverse opinions, collaboration, and striving to do the best. Thank you to everyone involved in this project for working so well together, listening to each other’s different ideas, and finding ways to incorporate them so together we can build something amazing.

What's new on Drupal.org? - January 2017

Drupal - Tue, 02/14/2017 - 08:42

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

Drupal.org updates Recognizing more types of contribution in the Drupal.org Marketplace

We were very pleased to announce an expansion of the issue credit system into a broader contribution credit system which recognizes more than just code contributions for the purposes of ranking organizations in the marketplace.

We now calculate the following 4 types of contribution into overall contribution credit:

User research for the upcoming industry pages

In a previous blog post on Drupal.org, we talked about our increasing focus on the adoption journey and our plans to create industry specific landing pages on Drupal.org. In January we did extensive user research with people in media and publishing, higher education, and government, which will be the first industries we promote. We're hoping to launch these pages very soon, so keep an eye on the home page.

Preparing for community elections for the Drupal Association board

The elections process for the community seats on the Drupal Association board kicks off with self-nominations in February each year. This means that we dedicated some time in January to making small refinements and improvements to the nomination process. In particular we've added more in-context educational materials about the board to the self-nomination form, including a video by executive director Megan Sanicki. We've also refined our candidate questions to help candidates express their unique qualifications.

If you're interested in bringing your perspective to the Drupal Association board, please nominate yourself.

Membership history messaging

To make it easier for members to understand their membership history, we've added new messaging to the membership join and renew pages. Users who go to join or renew their Drupal Association membership will now see a message indicating their current membership expiration date, their last contribution amount, a link to contribute again, and their auto-renewal status.

Migration of Drupal Association content to Drupal.org

In January we also migrated the majority of content from assoc.drupal.org to a new section on Drupal.org itself. This effort is part of our larger content restructure initiative. By moving Drupal Association content into Drupal.org we hope to increase discoverability of information about the DA, and create a tighter integration between Drupal Association news and the front-page news feed.

DrupalCI Checkstyle results now available on the DrupalCI dispatcher

Thanks to community member mile23, DrupalCI now supports automated code style testing. To see checkstyle results for any test on Drupal.org, click on the test result bubble and then click the 'view results' link to view the detailed test results on DrupalCI's jenkins dispatcher.

We're still gathering input and feedback for this initial release of the checkstyle feature, as we decide how to integrate the checkstyle results more tightly with Drupal.org. If you have feedback or suggestions please leave your comments in this issue: #1299710: [meta] Automate the coding-standards part of patch review.

Updated testing environments

DrupalCI supports testing code against a matrix of php and database versions. In January we updated the php environments that DrupalCI supports, so that you can test against the minimum supported versions or the latest point releases. Our 5.X containers have been upgraded to the latest version for each minor release (5.3.29, 5.4.45, 5.5.38, 5.6.29). The singular PHP 7 environment that we were using was following the 7.0.x branch of php7. This has now been expanded into four php 7 environments, 7.0 (7.0.14), 7.1 (7.1.0), 7.0.x, and 7.1.x.

The dev versions of php are primarily intended for Core to sense upstream changes to php before they become released, as our comprehensive test suite often finds unanticipated bugs in php7. Additionally some missing features in the php7 containers were added, specifically apcu.

Local testing improvements

DrupalCI has always supported local testing, in order to allow developers to test changes on their own machines. This is helpful for several reasons: it allows people to test on their own machines before triggering one of the DrupalCI test bots, it lets users troubleshoot failing tests, and it helps to eliminate the 'works on my machine' problem where code appears to work in a local environment, but fails on the test bots.

To make local testing even easier, DrupalCI now automatically generates a vagrant environment for local testing. To use this functionality simply clone the drupalci_testrunner.git repo and then run $ vagrant up from within the directory. Furthermore, DrupalCI can download a build.yml file from a dispatcher.drupalci.org url to replicate any test that has been run on Drupal.org. More information about this will be added to the DrupalCI documentation soon.

Adding test priority

DrupalCI runs thousands of tests of the Drupal codebase for core and contrib modules every month. These tests include commit and patch testing for the active development which may be occurring at any time day or night, as well as the hundreds of daily regression tests run for both core and contrib projects. To help make testing more responsive, we've added a notion of testing priority. When there is a queue of waiting tests, Drupal 8 core patch tests will take priority; followed by D8 branch tests; followed by D8 contrib tests; followed by Drupal 7 patch, branch, and contrib tests.

Community Initiatives Project Applications Revamp

Our primary community initiative priority for the first quarter of the new year is the Project Application Revamp. There are four phases to the revamp: 1) preserving security advisory coverage signals about projects, 2) transitioning security advisory coverage to an opt-in process, 3) opening the gates to allow any user to promote a project to full and create releases, 4) building new tools to incentivize code review and provide code quality signals on project pages. One of the changes we made as part of phase 1 was to adjust the way recommended releases are highlighted on Drupal.org project pages.

Contrib Documentation Migration

Project maintainers are now able to create documentation guides on their projects using the new documentation content types. Maintainers can then migrate their old documentation content into these new guides, or create new documentation pages. For more information about this process, please consult our guide to contrib documentation.

Help port Dreditor features to Drupal.org

Are you a Drupal.org power user who relies on Dreditor? Markcarver is currently leading the charge to port Dreditor features to Drupal.org, and invites anyone interested in contributing to join him in #dreditor on freenode IRC or the Dreditor GitHub.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects.

If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

2017 Community Board Election Begins 1 February

Drupal - Fri, 01/27/2017 - 12:11

Now that Drupal 8 is a year old, it is an exciting time to be on the Drupal Association Board. With Drupal always evolving, the Association must evolve with it so we can continue providing the right kind of support. And, it is the Drupal Association Board who develops the Association’s strategic direction by engaging in discussions around a number of strategic topics throughout their term. As a community member, you can be part of this important process by becoming an At-large Board Member.

We have two At-large positions on the Association Board of Directors. These positions are self-nominated and then elected by the community. Simply put, the At-large Director position is designed to ensure there is community representation on the Drupal Association Board. If you are interested in helping shape the future of the Drupal Association, we encourage you to read this post and nominate yourself between 1 February and 19 February 2017.

How do nominations and elections work?
Specifics of the election mechanics were decided through a community-based process in 2012 with participation by dozens of Drupal community members. More details can be found in the proposal that was approved by the Drupal Association Board in 2012 and adapted for use this year.

What does the Drupal Association Board do?
The Board of Directors of the Drupal Association are responsible for financial oversight and setting the strategic direction for serving the Drupal Association’s mission, which we achieve through Drupal.org and DrupalCon. Our mission is: Drupal powers the best of the Web.  The Drupal Association unites a global open source community to build and promote Drupal.

New board members will contribute to the strategic direction of the Drupal Association. Board members are advised of, but not responsible for matters related to the day-to-day operations of the Drupal Association, including program execution, staffing, etc.

Directors are expected to contribute around five hours per month and attend three in-person meetings per year (financial assistance is available if required).

Association board members, like all board members for US-based organizations, have three legal obligations: duty of care, duty of loyalty, and duty of obedience. In addition to these legal obligations, there is a lot of practical work that the board undertakes. These generally fall under the fiduciary responsibilities and include:

  • Overseeing Financial Performance
  • Setting Strategy
  • Setting and Reviewing Legal Policies
  • Fundraising
  • Managing the Executive Director

To accomplish all this, the board comes together three times a year during two-day retreats. These usually coincide with the North American and European DrupalCons as well as one February meeting. As a board member, you should expect to spend a minimum of five hours a month on board activities.

Some of the topics that will be discussed over the next year or two are:

  • Strengthening Drupal Association’s sustainability
  • Understanding what the Project needs to move forward and determine how the Association can help meet those needs through Drupal.org and DrupalCon
  • Growing Drupal adoption through our own channels and partner channels
  • Developing the strategic direction for DrupalCon and Drupal.org
  • And more!

Please watch this video to learn more.

Who can run?
There are no restrictions on who can run, and only self-nominations are accepted.

Before self-nominating, we want candidates to understand what is expected of board members and what types of topics they will discuss during their term. That is why we now require candidates to:

What will I need to do during the elections?
During the elections, members of the Drupal community will ask questions of candidates. You can post comments on candidate profiles here on assoc.drupal.org and to the public Drupal Association group at http://groups.drupal.org/drupal-association.

In the past, we held group “meet the candidate” interviews. With 22 candidates last year, group videos didn’t allow each candidate to properly express themselves. This year, we will replace the group interview and allow candidates to create their own 3 minute video and add it to their candidate profile page. These videos must be posted by 20 February, the Association will promote the videos to the community from 20 February through 4 March, 2017.

How do I run?
From 1 - 19 February, go here to nominate yourself.  If you are considering running, please read the entirety of this post, and then be prepared to complete the self-nomination form. This form will be open on 1 February, 2017 through 19 February, 2017 at midnight UTC. You'll be asked for some information about yourself and your interest in the Drupal Association Board. When the nominations close, your candidate profile will be published and available for Drupal community members to browse. Comments will be enabled, so please monitor your candidate profile so you can respond to questions from community members.

Reminder, you must review the materials listed above before completing your candidate profile:

Who can vote?
Voting is open to all individuals who have a Drupal.org account by the time nominations open and who have logged in at least once in the past year. If you meet this criteria, your account will be added to the voters list on association.drupal.org and you will have access to the voting.
To vote, you will rank candidates in order of your preference (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.). The results will be calculated using an "instant runoff" method. For an accessible explanation of how instant runoff vote tabulation works, see videos linked in this discussion.

Elections process
Voting will be held from 6 March, 2017 through 18 March, 2017. During this period, you can review and comment on candidate profiles on assoc.drupal.org and engage all candidates through posting to the Drupal Association group. Have questions? Please contact Drupal Association Executive Director, Megan Sanicki. Many thanks to nedjo for pioneering this process and documenting it so well!

Flickr photo: Clyde Robinson

What’s new on Drupal.org? - December 2016

Drupal - Tue, 01/24/2017 - 16:04

Read our Roadmap to understand how this work falls into priorities set by the Drupal Association with direction and collaboration from the Board and community.

Our December update comes to you a bit later than our usual monthly posts, for all the usual practical reasons: holidays, vacations, and our staff retreat in early January. But also, because we've been reflecting on the past year, and planning for the year to come. You'll soon hear about our initiatives for 2017, but for now— let's dive into what we did in December.

Drupal.org updates DrupalCon Baltimore

At the beginning of December we launched the full site for DrupalCon Baltimore, which is coming up April 24-28. For the first time, we launched the full event site including the call for papers, scholarship applications, and registration all on the same day.

Early bird pricing is available for a limited time, so we encourage you to register today.

Stable release of the Composer Façade

Drupal.org's support for Composer has been in development since the beginning of last year. We released the public alpha of our composer endpoints at DrupalCon New Orleans, and then entered beta over the course of this past summer. After a period of feedback, bug fixes, and further refinement with the help of core and contrib developers we announced the stable release of Drupal.org's composer support on December 21st.

We'd like to thank the following community members for their help with this initiative: seldeak, webflo, timmillwood, dixon_, badjava, cweagans, tstoeckler, and mile23. We'd also like to thank Appnovation for sponsoring our initial Composer support work.

Improved messaging for new users

One of the innovations of Drupal.org's online community that we introduced about 2 years ago, is the process by which new users get confirmed by trusted users. As a user of Drupal.org, you know that when you see a new user with a 'confirm' button under their user icon, you can check their recent activity and help confirm for us that they're a real user (not a bot or spammer who managed to slip through).

However, we received some feedback from recently registered users, that this process was too opaque. New users did not have enough guidance to understand that they can only perform a sub-set of site activities until another user confirms them.

After hearing this feedback, we spent some time in December improving the messaging tonew users when they first sign up on Drupal.org— so they can better understand how to become confirmed.

DrupalCI refactored and updated to use composer

In December we also completed a refactor of DrupalCI and updated the testing system to use Composer when testing Drupal. This means we can now test projects with external composer dependencies on Drupal.org. Other new features and bugfixes include: more available test artifacts; dependency changes can now be submitted in patches to composer json; the test runner produces a build file that can be downloaded and run locally to re-execute any test verbatim. There are more added features as well..

This work has continued into January, particularly around making more testing environments available, and adding new test types (such as code sniffer). Look for additional updates in the upcoming January report.

Special thanks to mile23 for collaborating with us on this work.

Jenkins upgraded to better manage our EC2 Instances

The cost of automated testing for the Drupal project is a significant expense for the Drupal Association. In December we updated Jenkins and several of the plugins that are used to orchestrate the creation and management of DrupalCI testbots, and now our enforcement of instance limits is much more reliable. In December this saved us nearly 50% on our testing bill, without a significant increase in testing wait times. In January we are projecting a similar savings.

The work of community member fabianX might also provide similar savings for the project, so we encourage contributors involved in core to help review: #2759197: [D7] Improve WebTestCase performance by 50% and #2747075: [meta] Improve WebTestCase / BrowserTestBase performance by 50%

HTTP/2 Support enabled

HTTP/2 is the next generation network protocol that decreases latency in page loads by using better data compression, pipelining, and server push. In December we enabled HTTP/2 support for Drupal.org, improving performance for all users with modern browsers that support the standard.

Community Initiatives Preparing for the Project Applications Revamp

In November the Drupal 8 User Guide went live, so in December we prepared for the next community initiative on our roadmap - the Project Application Revamp. Over the course of the last several months we've been doing pre-work around this initiative to ensure that the appropriate signals about security advisory coverage and recommended releases are provided on project pages. This pre-work will help ensure that Drupal users still have good signals to project quality, even as we open up the creation of full projects.

Initiatives need your help

Are you a Drupal.org power user who relies on Dreditor? Markcarver is currently leading the charge to port Dreditor features to Drupal.org, and invites anyone interested in contributing to join him in #dreditor on freenode IRC or the Dreditor GitHub.

Is the written word your domain? Consider putting your skills to use by becoming a maintainer of Drupal documentation. If you are a developer interested in contributing code to the new documentation system, please contact tvn.

———

As always, we’d like to say thanks to all the volunteers who work with us, and to the Drupal Association Supporters, who made it possible for us to work on these projects.

If you would like to support our work as an individual or an organization, consider becoming a member of the Drupal Association.

Follow us on Twitter for regular updates: @drupal_org, @drupal_infra

Predictions for 2017

Drupal - Sun, 01/15/2017 - 11:18

Like last year around this date, it is the time of year where we predict what the future wil bring for Drupal. Will decoupled Drupal get a head start? Wil chatbots be written in Drupal, will our tool fuel the Internet of Things, will the Whitehouse still run Drupal and will there be an IPO of a Drupal company?

Time to put your predictions, deep thoughts and even deeper thoughts online, and post them as a comment here. And in case you lack inspiration, see the previous predictions for 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

Recognizing more types of contribution in the Drupal.org Marketplace

Drupal - Thu, 01/12/2017 - 12:56

Within weeks of introducing the contribution credit system on Drupal.org we realized we had created something powerful. Like all open source projects, Drupal has a behind-the-scenes economy of contribution in which individuals, organizations, and end users work together to maintain the software as a public good. That behind-the-scenes economy was brought to the fore when we chose to rank the Drupal Marketplace by issue credits. For the first time, Drupal.org gave businesses a direct financial incentive to contribute code.  

Being good stewards of these incentives is a sobering responsibility, but also a great opportunity. We can use this system to recognize the selfless effort of our community volunteers, to reward the organizations that sponsor their employees' time to give back to the project, and to connect end-users with the organizations that are the biggest contributors.

But as we often say in this community—contribution is more than code. It is the time provided by dedicated volunteers; the talent of community organizers, documentation maintainers, and developers; and the treasure provided by organizations that sponsor Drupal events and fund the operations and infrastructure that maintain the project.

What are we changing?

We’re updating the ranking algorithm for Drupal.org’s Marketplace of service providers and list of all organizations in the Drupal ecosystem. We've expanded on the issue credit system to create a more generic contribution credit system which lets us recognize more types of contribution. Each type of contribution is now weighted to give the organization an overall amount of contribution credit. We've built this system so that we can continuously evolve the incentives it creates by adjusting the weight given to each type of contribution as the project's needs change. To prevent gaming, we will not be publishing the exact weights or total contribution score, but those weights have been reviewed by the Association Board and Community Working Group.

We've carefully chosen a few new types of contribution to factor into the ranking. These were selected because they create incentives to reach specific goals: encouraging organizations to sponsor development of Drupal, gathering more Drupal 8 success stories that can be used to promote Drupal adoption, and recognizing the financial contributions that promote the fiscal health of the Drupal association.

We now calculate the following 4 types of contribution into overall contribution credit:

What about other types of contribution?

Of course, these new factors still don't include all types of contribution. This iteration aims to add measurable factors that reward the behavior of organizations that are good Drupal citizens, and incentivize some of the most important contributions that have a big impact in moving the project forward. But there are other factors we'd like to include in the future! We're keeping track of these additional kinds of contribution, such as sponsoring local user groups, organizing training days, writing documentation, and more, in this issue: #2649100: Improve contribution statistics on user and organization profiles.

There are two factors in particular that we are not yet including that we'd like to address.

The first is project application reviews. These reviews are a critical part of the lifecycle of a new project on Drupal.org, but because we are making the Project Application Revamp a key priority for the first part of 2017, this was not our focus in this initial update. We may revisit this factor as the Project Application Revamp initiative gets underway.

The second is camp organization. We know that there are many individuals and organizations who invest heavily in Drupal Camps, and this has been a critical part of the project's success. However, at this time our data about the individuals and organizations who participate in camp organization is purely self-reported, and therefore too vulnerable to manipulation to include in the algorithm at this time. In the future we hope we can find a responsible way to measure and credit this kind of contribution.

We’ll continue to look for other good factors to add, and do our best to weigh them fairly.

How often will the algorithm change? Who governs these changes?

As this is our first major change to the marketplace ranking system since the launch of issue credits, we may need to make some small adjustments in the first weeks following the launch. However, we know that too frequent changes to the incentive structure will be frustrating for the individuals and organizations who are contributing to the project. Therefore, after the initial tuning we intend to update the marketplace ranking system on a roughly 6 month cycle.

While the primary responsibility to manage the contribution credit system is ours, we have committed to vetting these and future changes with members of the Drupal Association Board and Community Working Group.

Pages